Migrate Amazon Web Services (AWS) EC2 VM to Azure Cloud

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In my previous blog, I have written how to migrate workloads from VMware to Azure Cloud.  In this tutorial, I am going to elaborate you how to migrate Amazon Web Services (AWS) EC2 virtual machines (VMs) to Azure VMs by … Continue reading

Backup VMware Server Workloads to Azure Backup Server

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In my previous article, I explained how to install and configure Azure Backup Server. This article explains how to configure Azure Backup Server to help protect VMware  Server workloads. I am assuming that you already have Azure Backup Server installed. … Continue reading

Azure Backup Server v2

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Azure Backup is used for backups and DR, and it works with managed disks as well as unmanaged disks. You can create a backup job with time-based backups, easy VM restoration, and backup retention policies. The following table is a … Continue reading

Nimble Hybrid Storage for Azure VM

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Microsoft Azure can be integrated with Nimble Cloud-Connected Storage based on the Nimble Storage Predictive Flash platform via Microsoft Azure ExpressRoute or Equinix Cloud Exchange connectivity solutions. The Nimble storage is located in Equinix colocation facilities at proximity to Azure … Continue reading

Configuring EMC DD Boost with Veeam Availability Suite

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This article provides a tour of the configuration steps required to integrate EMC Data Domain System with Veeam Availability Suite 9 as well as provides benefits of using EMC DD Boost for backup application. Data Domain Boost (DD Boost) software … Continue reading

Understand “X as a Service” or get stuck in “Pizza box as a Service”

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“X or Anything as a Service” is an acronym used by many cloud provider and offering almost end to end services to a business. The most traditional use of “X” are Software as a Service (XaaS), Infrastructure as a Service … Continue reading

Veeam integrate with EMC and NetApp Storage Snapshots!

Taking a VMware snapshots and Hyper-v checkpoint can produce a serious workload on VM performance, and it can take considerable effort by sys admin to overcome this technical challenge and meet the required service level agreement. Most Veeam user will run their backup and replication after hours considering impact to the production environment, but this can’t be your only backup solution. What if storage itself goes down, or gets corrupted? Even with storage-based replication, you need to take your data out of the single fault domain. This is why many customers prefer to additionally make true backups stored on different storage. Never to store production and backup on to a same storage.

Veeam1

Source: Veeam

Now you can take advantage of storage snapshot. Veeam decided to work with storage vendor such as EMC and NetApp to integrate production storage, leveraging storage snapshot functionality to reduce the impact on the environment from snapshot/checkpoint removal during backup and replication.

Supported Storage

  • EMC VNX/VNXe
  • NetApp FAS
  • NetApp FlexArray (V-Series)
  • NetApp Data ONTAP Edge VSA
  • HP 3PAR StoreServ
  • HP StoreVirtual
  • HP StoreVirtual VSA
  • IBM N series

Unsupported Storage

  • Dell Compellent

NOTE: My own experience with HP StoreVirtual and HP 3PAR are awful. I had to remove HP StoreVirtual from production store and introduce other fibre channel to cope with workload. Even though Veeam tested snapshot mechanism with HP, I would recommend avoid HP StoreVirtual if you have high IO workload.

Benefits

Veeam suggest that you can get lower RPOs and lower RTOs with Backup from Storage Snapshots and Veeam Explorer for Storage Snapshots.

Veeam and EMC together allow you to:

  • Minimize impact on production VMs
  • Rapidly create backups from EMC VNX or VNXe storage snapshots up to 20 times faster than the competition
  • Easily recover individual items in two minutes or less, without staging or intermediate steps

As a result of integrating Veeam with EMC, you can backup 20 times faster and restore faster using Veeam Explorer. Hence users can achieve much lower RPOs (recovery point objectives) and lower RTOs (recovery time objectives) with minimal impact on production VMs.

How it works

Veeam Backup & Replication works with EMC and NetApp storage, along with VMware to create backups and replicas from storage snapshots in the following way.

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Source: Veeam

The backup and replication job:

  1. Analyzes which VMs in the job have disks on supported storage.
  2. Triggers a vSphere snapshot for all VMs located on the same storage volume. (As a part of a vSphere snapshot, Veeam’s application-aware processing of each VM is performed normally.)
  3. Triggers a snapshot of said storage volume once all VM snapshots have been created.
  4. Retrieves the CBT information for VM snapshots created on step 2.
  5. Immediately triggers the removal of the vSphere snapshots on the production VMs.
  6. Mounts the storage snapshot to one of the backup proxies connected into the storage fabric.
  7. Reads new and changed virtual disk data blocks directly from the storage snapshot and transports them to the backup repository or replica VM.
  8. Triggers the removal storage snapshot once all VMs have been backed up.

VMs run off snapshots for the shortest possible time (Subject to storage array- EMC works better), while jobs obtain data from VM snapshot files preserved in the storage snapshot. As the result, VM snapshots do not get a chance to grow large and can be committed very quickly without overloading production storage with extended merge procedure, as is the case with classic techniques for backing up from VM snapshots.

Integration with EMC storage will bring great benefit to customers who wants to take advantage of their storage array. Veeam Availability Suite v9 will provide the chance to reduce IO on to your storage array and bring your SLA under control.

References:

Backup from storage snapshots

Integration with emc storage snapshot

Veeam integrates with emc snapshots

New Veeam availability suite version 9

 

 

 

Bulk Migration of Printer from Windows Server 2008/R2 to Windows Server 2012/R2

Bulk Migration of Printer from Windows Server 2008/R2 to Windows Server 2012/R2

The following steps are from those who would like to migrate print server from legacy Server 2008/R2 to Windows Server 2012/R2. This steps will bring new drivers and avoid bringing old corrupt drivers and configuration into new systems. If you utilize print migration wizard then you may bring legacy corrupt driver into new systems. This steps also helpful if you are using Citrix Universal Print Driver.

Step1: Download correct and latest Generic/Universal/Global print driver. HP called Universal. Other manufacturer may call global or generic driver. Help yourself from Bing.

Step2: Install Generic Driver.

Open Server manager>Print Management>print Servers>Server name>Drivers.

Right Click and add x64 & x86 drivers.

Step3: Extract Legacy print Configuration.

Open PowerShell as an administrator. Run the following command.

$printserver = “printservername.domain.com”

Get-WMIObject -class Win32_Printer -computer $printserver | Select Name,DriverName,PortName,sharename,location,comment | Export-CSV -path ‘C:\printers.csv’

Step4: Create a CSV file shown below from the CSV File extracted in step3.

Create a CSV fileand store the file into c:\printers.csv in new Windows Server 2012 R2.

First row of CSV shown below. Add relevant rows to your CSV file.

PrintServer|Driver|PortName|IPAddress|Sharename|Location|Comment|Printername

Step5: Create a Powershell script as below (Extracted the script from http://poshcode.org/1462)

Open a notepad. Copy from below and paste into the notepad. Rename to CreatePrinter.PS1

function CreatePrinter {

$server = $args[0]

$print = ([WMICLASS]”\\$server\ROOT\cimv2:Win32_Printer”).createInstance()

$print.drivername = $args[1]

$print.PortName = $args[2]

$print.Shared = $true

$print.Sharename = $args[3]

$print.Location = $args[4]

$print.Comment = $args[5]

$print.DeviceID = $args[6]

$print.Put()

}

function CreatePrinterPort {

$server = $args[0]

$port = ([WMICLASS]”\\$server\ROOT\cimv2:Win32_TCPIPPrinterPort”).createInstance()

$port.Name= $args[1]

$port.SNMPEnabled=$false

$port.Protocol=1

$port.HostAddress= $args[2]

$port.Put()

}

$printers = Import-Csv c:\printers.csv

foreach ($printer in $printers) {

CreatePrinterPort $printer.Printserver $printer.Portname $printer.IPAddress

CreatePrinter $printer.Printserver $printer.Driver $printer.Portname $printer.Sharename $printer.Location $printer.Comment $printer.Printername

}

Step6: run the scrip

Log on to new Server 2012/R2 print server. Open PowerShell as an administrator. Run the above script. You have to tweak little bit such as additional drivers. Amendment of print properties. But this is little effort than creating entire print server manually.

Further reading:

install unsigned drivers

FF TMG 2010—Can future be altered?

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I read the following articles about Microsoft Forefront TMG 2010. I was shocked by the news. TMG 2010 is one of the beautiful product Wintel Engineers and Security Administer can be proud off. I believe I am one of the … Continue reading

Backup, restore or migrate Print server in easy steps

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Have you added a print server to your DRP work sheet? It is absolutely necessary when you have hundreds of printers in your print server/servers. Here is a solution for backup/restore/migrate print server. Print migration 3.1 has been replaced with … Continue reading