Migrate Amazon Web Services (AWS) EC2 VM to Azure Cloud

In my previous blog, I have written how to migrate workloads from VMware to Azure Cloud.  In this tutorial, I am going to elaborate you how to migrate Amazon Web Services (AWS) EC2 virtual machines (VMs) to Azure VMs by using Azure Site Recovery.

AWStoAzure

Supported Workloads Which can be migrated:

  1. Windows Server 2016 or later version
  2. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.7

Prerequisites

  1. The Mobility service must be installed on each VM that you want to replicate. Site Recovery installs this service automatically when you enable replication for the VM.
  2. For non-domain joined Windows VMs, disable Remote User Access control on the local machine at the registry, under HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\System, add the DWORD entry LocalAccountTokenFilterPolicy and set the value to 1.
  3. A separate VM in AWS subscriptions to use as Site Recovery Configuration Server. This instance must be running Windows Server 2012 R2.

Credential Requirements

  1. A root on the source Linux server
  2. A Domain Admin Credentials for Windows VM.
  3. A Local Admin Account for non-domain joined VM.

Prepare Azure resources (Target)

Step1: Create a Storage Account

  1. In the Azure portal, in the left menu, select Create a resource > Storage > Storage account.
  2. Create a Storage Account in your region.

Step2: Create a Recovery Vault

  1. In the Azure portal, select All services. Search for and then select Recovery Services vaults.
  2. Add new Recovery Vault in your region.

Step3: Add a separate network for migrated VM

  1. In the Azure portal, select Create a resource > Networking > Virtual network.
  2. Add new Network and Address Space.

Step4: Prepare Recovery Goal

  1. On your vault page in the Azure portal, in the Getting Started section, select Site Recovery, and then select Prepare Infrastructure.
  2. Create a protection goal from On-prem to Azure.
  3. When you’re done, select OK to move to the next section.

Step5: Create a Replication Policy

  1. To create a new replication policy, click Site Recovery infrastructure > Replication Policies > +Replication Policy. In Create replication policy, specify a policy name.
  2. In RPO threshold, specify the recovery point objective (RPO) limit. This value specifies how often data recovery points are created. An alert is generated if continuous replication exceeds this limit.
  3. In Recovery point retention, specify how long (in hours) the retention window is for each recovery point. Replicated VMs can be recovered to any point in a window. Up to 24 hours retention is supported for machines replicated to premium storage, and 72 hours for standard storage.
  4. In App-consistent snapshot frequency, specify how often (in minutes) recovery points containing application-consistent snapshots will be created. Click OK to create the policy.

Prepare Source Environment (AWS)

Step6: Prepare Source ASR Configuration Server

  1. Log on to the EC2 instance where you would like to install Configuration Server
  1. Configure the proxy on the EC2 instance VM you’re using as the configuration server so that it can access the service URLs.
  2. Download Microsoft Azure Site Recovery Unified Setup. You can download it to your local machine and then copy it to the VM you’re using as the configuration server.
  3. Select the Download button to download the vault registration key. Copy the downloaded file to the VM you’re using as the configuration server.
  4. On the VM, right-click the installer you downloaded for Microsoft Azure Site Recovery Unified Setup, and then select Run as administrator.
  5. Under Before You Begin, select Install the configuration server and process server, and then select Next.
  6. In Third-Party Software License, select I accept the third-party license agreement, and then select Next.
  7. In Registration, select Browse, and then go to where you put the vault registration key file. Select Next.
  8. In Internet Settings, select Connect to Azure Site Recovery without a proxy server, and then select Next.
  9. The Prerequisites Check page runs checks for several items. When it’s finished, select Next.
  10. In MySQL Configuration, provide the required passwords, and then select Next.
  11. In Environment Details, select No. You don’t need to protect VMware machines. Then, select Next.
  12. In Install Location, select Next to accept the default.
  13. In Network Selection, select Next to accept the default.
  14. In Summary, select Install. Installation Progress shows you information about the installation process. When it’s finished, select Finish. A window displays a message about a reboot. Select OK. Next, a window displays a message about the configuration server connection passphrase. Copy the passphrase to your clipboard and save it somewhere safe.
  15. On the VM, run cspsconfigtool.exe to create one or more management accounts on the configuration server. Make sure that the management accounts have administrator permissions on the EC2 instances that you want to migrate.

Step7: Enable Replication for a AWS EC2 VM

  1. Click Replicate application > Source.
  2. In Source, select the configuration server.
  3. In Machine type, select Physical machines.
  4. Select the process server (the configuration server). Then click OK.
  5. In Target, select the subscription and the resource group in which you want to create the Azure VMs after failover. Choose the deployment model that you want to use in Azure (classic or resource management).
  6. Select the Azure storage account you want to use for replicating data.
  7. Select the Azure network and subnet to which Azure VMs will connect, when they’re created after failover.
  8. Select Configure now for selected machines, to apply the network setting to all machines you select for protection. Select Configure later to select the Azure network per machine.
  9. In Physical Machines, and click +Physical machine. Specify the name and IP address. Select the operating system of the machine you want to replicate. It takes a few minutes for the servers to be discovered and listed.
  10. In Properties > Configure properties, select the account that will be used by the process server to automatically install the Mobility service on the machine.
  11. In Replication settings > Configure replication settings, verify that the correct replication policy is selected.
  12. Click Enable Replication. You can track progress of the Enable Protection job in Settings > Jobs > Site Recovery Jobs. After the Finalize Protection job runs the machine is ready for failover.

Test failover at Azure Portal

Step8: Test a Failover

  1. On the page for your vault, go to Protected items > Replicated Items. Select the VM, and then select Test Failover.
  2. Select a recovery point to use for the failover:
    • Latest processed: Fails over the VM to the latest recovery point that was processed by Site Recovery. The time stamp is shown. With this option, no time is spent processing data, so it provides a low recovery time objective (RTO).
    • Latest app-consistent: This option fails over all VMs to the latest app-consistent recovery point. The time stamp is shown.
    • Custom: Select any recovery point.
  3. In Test Failover, select the target Azure network to which Azure VMs will be connected after failover occurs. This should be the network you created in Prepare Azure resources.
  4. Select OK to begin the failover. To track progress, select the VM to view its properties. Or you can select the Test Failover job on the page for your vault. To do this, select Monitoring and reports > Jobs > Site Recovery jobs.
  5. When the failover finishes, the replica Azure VM appears in the Azure portal. To view the VM, select Virtual Machines. Ensure that the VM is the appropriate size, that it’s connected to the right network, and that it’s running.
  6. You should now be able to connect to the replicated VM in Azure.
  7. To delete Azure VMs that were created during the test failover, select Cleanup test failover in the recovery plan. In Notes, record and save any observations associated with the test failover.

Migrate an AWS EC2 Instance to Azure Cloud

Step9: Trigger Azure Migration

  1. In Protected items > Replicated items, select the AWS instances, and then select Failover.
  2. In Failover, select a Recovery Point to failover to. Select the latest recovery point.
  3. Select Shut down machine before beginning failover if you want Site Recovery to attempt to do a shutdown of source virtual machines before triggering the failover. Failover continues even if shutdown fails. You can follow the failover progress on the Jobs
  4. Ensure that the VM appears in Replicated items.
  5. Right-click each VM, and then select Complete Migration. This finishes the migration process, stops replication for the AWS VM, and stops Site Recovery billing for the VM.

 

Backup VMware Server Workloads to Azure Backup Server

In my previous article, I explained how to install and configure Azure Backup Server. This article explains how to configure Azure Backup Server to help protect VMware  Server workloads. I am assuming that you already have Azure Backup Server installed. Azure Backup Server can back up, or help protect, VMware vCenter Server version 5.5 and later version.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step1: Create a secure connection to the vCenter Server

By default, Azure Backup Server communicates with each vCenter Server via an HTTPS channel. To turn on the secure communication, we recommend that you install the VMware Certificate Authority (CA) certificate on Azure Backup Server.

To fix this issue, and create a secure connection, download the trusted root CA certificates.

  1. In the browser on Azure Backup Server, enter the URL to the vSphere Web Client. The vSphere Web Client login page appears. Example, https://vcenter.domain.com

At the bottom of the information for administrators and developers, locate the Download trusted root CA certificates link.

  1. Click Download trusted root CA certificates.

The vCenter Server downloads a file to your local computer. The file’s name is named download. Depending on your browser, you receive a message that asks whether to open or save the file.

  1. Save the file to a location on Azure Backup Server. When you save the file, add the .zip file name extension. The file is a .zip file that contains the information about the certificates. With the .zip extension, you can use the extraction tools.
  2. Right-click zip, and then select Extract Allto extract the contents. The CRL file has an extension that begins with a sequence like .r0 or .r1. The CRL file is associated with a certificate.
  3. In the certsfolder, right-click the root certificate file, and then click Rename. Change the root certificate’s extension to .crt. When you’re asked if you’re sure you want to change the extension, click Yes or OK.  Right-click the root certificate and from the pop-up menu, select Install Certificate. The Certificate Import Wizard dialog box appears.
  4. In the Certificate Import Wizarddialog box, select Local Machine as the destination for the certificate, and then click Next to continue.

If you’re asked if you want to allow changes to the computer, click Yes or OK, to all the changes.

  1. On the Certificate Storepage, select Place all certificates in the following store, and then click Browse to choose the certificate store.

The Select Certificate Store dialog box appears.

  1. Select Trusted Root Certification Authoritiesas the destination folder for the certificates, and then click OK. The Trusted Root Certification Authorities folder is confirmed as the certificate store. Click Next.
  2. On the Completing the Certificate Import Wizardpage, verify that the certificate is in the desired folder, and then click Finish.
  3. Sign in to the vCenter Server to confirm that your connection is secure.

If you have secure boundaries within your organization, and don’t want to turn on the HTTPS protocol, use the following procedure to disable the secure communications.

Step2: Disable secure communication protocol

If your organization doesn’t require the HTTPS protocol, use the following steps to disable HTTPS. To disable the default behavior, create a registry key that ignores the default behavior.

  1. Copy and paste the following text into a .txt file.

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Microsoft Data Protection Manager\VMWare]

“IgnoreCertificateValidation”=dword:00000001

  1. Save the file to your Azure Backup Server computer. For the file name, use DisableSecureAuthentication.reg.
  2. Double-click the file to activate the registry entry.

Step3: Create a role and user account on the vCenter Server

To establish the necessary user credentials to back up the vCenter Server workloads, create a role with specific privileges, and then associate the user account with the role.

Azure Backup Server uses a username and password to authenticate with the vCenter Server. Azure Backup Server uses these credentials as authentication for all backup operations.

To add a vCenter Server role and its privileges for a backup administrator:

  1. Sign in to the vCenter Server, and then in the vCenter Server Navigatorpanel, click Administration.
  2. In Administrationselect Roles, and then in the Roles panel click the add role icon (the + symbol). The Create Role dialog box appears.
  3. In the Create Roledialog box, in the Role name box, enter BackupAdminRole. The role name can be whatever you like, but it should be recognizable for the role’s purpose.
  4. Select the privileges for the appropriate version of vCenter, and then click OK. The following table identifies the required privileges for vCenter 6.0 and vCenter 5.5.

When you select the privileges, click the icon next to the parent label to expand the parent and view the child privileges. To select the VirtualMachine privileges, you need to go several levels into the parent child hierarchy. You don’t need to select all child privileges within a parent privilege. After you click OK, the new role appears in the list on the Roles panel.

Privileges for vCenter 6.0 Privileges for vCenter 5.5
Datastore.AllocateSpace Datastore.AllocateSpace
Global.ManageCustomFields Global.ManageCustomerFields
Global.SetCustomFields
Host.Local.CreateVM Network.Assign
Network.Assign
Resource.AssignVMToPool
VirtualMachine.Config.AddNewDisk VirtualMachine.Config.AddNewDisk
VirtualMachine.Config.AdvanceConfig VirtualMachine.Config.AdvancedConfig
VirtualMachine.Config.ChangeTracking VirtualMachine.Config.ChangeTracking
VirtualMachine.Config.HostUSBDevice
VirtualMachine.Config.QueryUnownedFiles
VirtualMachine.Config.SwapPlacement VirtualMachine.Config.SwapPlacement
VirtualMachine.Interact.PowerOff VirtualMachine.Interact.PowerOff
VirtualMachine.Inventory.Create VirtualMachine.Inventory.Create
VirtualMachine.Provisioning.DiskRandomAccess
VirtualMachine.Provisioning.DiskRandomRead VirtualMachine.Provisioning.DiskRandomRead
VirtualMachine.State.CreateSnapshot VirtualMachine.State.CreateSnapshot
VirtualMachine.State.RemoveSnapshot VirtualMachine.State.RemoveSnapshot

Step4: Create a vCenter Server user account and permissions

After the role with privileges is set up, create a user account. The user account has a name and password, which provides the credentials that are used for authentication.

  1. To create a user account, in the vCenter Server Navigatorpanel, click Users and Groups. The vCenter Users and Groups panel appears.
  2. In the vCenter Users and Groupspanel, select the Users tab, and then click the add users icon (the + symbol). The New User dialog box appears.
  3. In the New Userdialog box, add the user’s information and then click OK. In this procedure, the username is BackupAdmin. The new user account appears in the list.
  4. To associate the user account with the role, in the Navigatorpanel, click Global Permissions. In the Global Permissions panel, select the Manage tab, and then click the add icon (the + symbol). The Global Permissions Root – Add Permission dialog box appears.
  5. In the Global Permission Root – Add Permissiondialog box, click Add to choose the user or group.  The Select Users/Groups dialog box appears.
  6. In the Select Users/Groupsdialog box, choose BackupAdmin and then click Add. In Users, the domain\username format is used for the user account. If you want to use a different domain, choose it from the Domain Click OK to add the selected users to the Add Permission dialog box.
  7. Now that you’ve identified the user, assign the user to the role. In Assigned Role, from the drop-down list, select BackupAdminRole, and then click OK. On the Managetab in the Global Permissions panel, the new user account and the associated role appear in the list.

Step6: Establish vCenter Server credentials on Azure Backup Server

  1. To open Azure Backup Server, double-click the icon on the Azure Backup Server desktop.
  2. In the Azure Backup Server console, click Management, click Production Servers, and then on the tool ribbon, click Manage VMware. The Manage Credentialsdialog box appears.
  3. In the Manage Credentialsdialog box, click Add to open the Add Credential dialog box.
  4. In the Add Credentialdialog box, enter a name and a description for the new credential. Then specify the username and password. The name, Contoso Vcenter credential is used to identify the credential in the next procedure. Use the same username and password that is used for the vCenter Server. If the vCenter Server and Azure Backup Server are not in the same domain, in User name, specify the domain.

Click Add to add the new credential to Azure Backup Server. The new credential appears in the list in the Manage Credentials dialog box.

  1. To close the Manage Credentialsdialog box, click the X in the upper-right corner.

Step7: Add the vCenter Server to Azure Backup Server

Production Server Addition Wizard is used to add the vCenter Server to Azure Backup Server. To open Production Server Addition Wizard, complete the following procedure:

  1. In the Azure Backup Server console, click Management, click Production Servers, and then click Add. The Production Server Addition Wizarddialog box appears.
  2. On the Select Production Server typepage, select VMware Servers, and then click Next.
  3. In Server Name/IP Address, specify the fully qualified domain name (FQDN) or IP address of the VMware server. If all the ESXi servers are managed by the same vCenter, you can use the vCenter name.
  4. In SSL Port, enter the port that is used to communicate with the VMware server. Use port 443, which is the default port, unless you know that a different port is required.
  5. In Specify Credential, select the credential that you created earlier.
  6. Click Addto add the VMware server to the list of Added VMware Servers, and then click Next to move to the next page in the wizard.
  7. In the Summarypage, click Add to add the specified VMware server to Azure Backup Server. The VMware server backup is an agentless backup, and the new server is added immediately. The Finishpage shows you the results.

After you add the vCenter Server to Azure Backup Server, the next step is to create a protection group. The protection group specifies the various details for short or long-term retention, and it is where you define and apply the backup policy. The backup policy is the schedule for when backups occur, and what is backed up.

Step8: Configure a protection group

After you check that you have proper storage, use the Create New Protection Group wizard to add VMware virtual machines.

  1. In the Azure Backup Server console, click Protection, and in the tool ribbon, click Newto open the Create New Protection Group wizard.

The Create New Protection Group wizard dialog box appears. Click Next to advance to the Select protection group type page.

  1. On the Select Protection group typepage, select Servers and then click Next. The Select group memberspage appears.
  2. On the Select group memberspage, the available members and the selected members appear. Select the members that you want to protect, and then click Next.

When you select a member, if you select a folder that contains other folders or VMs, those folders and VMs are also selected. The inclusion of the folders and VMs in the parent folder is called folder-level protection. To remove a folder or VM, clear the check box.

  1. On the Select Data Protection Methodpage, enter a name for the protection group. Short-term protection (to disk) and online protection are selected. If you want to use online protection (to Azure), you must use short-term protection to disk. Click Next to proceed to the short-term protection range.
  2. On the Specify Short-Term Goalspage, for Retention Range, specify the number of days that you want to retain recovery points that are stored to disk. If you want to change the time and days when recovery points are taken, click Modify. The short-term recovery points are full backups. They are not incremental backups. When you are satisfied with the short-term goals, click Next.
  3. On the Review Disk Allocationpage, review and if necessary, modify the disk space for the VMs. The recommended disk allocations are based on the retention range that is specified in the Specify Short-Term Goals page, the type of workload, and the size of the protected data (identified in step 3).
    • Data size:Size of the data in the protection group.
    • Disk space:The recommended amount of disk space for the protection group. If you want to modify this setting, you should allocate total space that is slightly larger than the amount that you estimate each data source grows.
    • Colocate data:If you turn on colocation, multiple data sources in the protection can map to a single replica and recovery point volume. Colocation isn’t supported for all workloads.
    • Automatically grow:If you turn on this setting, if data in the protected group outgrows the initial allocation, System Center Data Protection Manager tries to increase the disk size by 25 percent.
    • Storage pool details:Shows the status of the storage pool, including total and remaining disk size.

When you are satisfied with the space allocation, click Next.

  1. On the Choose Replica Creation Methodpage, specify how you want to generate the initial copy, or replica, of the protected data on Azure Backup Server.

The default is Automatically over the network and Now. If you use the default, we recommend that you specify an off-peak time. Choose Later and specify a day and time.  For large amounts of data or less-than-optimal network conditions, consider replicating the data offline by using removable media. After you have made your choices, click Next.

  1. On the Consistency Check Optionspage, select how and when to automate the consistency checks. You can run consistency checks when replica data becomes inconsistent, or on a set schedule. If you don’t want to configure automatic consistency checks, you can run a manual check. In the protection area of the Azure Backup Server console, right-click the protection group and then select Perform Consistency Check. Click Next to move to the next page.
  2. On the Specify Online Protection Datapage, select one or more data sources that you want to protect. You can select the members individually, or click Select All to choose all members. After you choose the members, click Next.
  3. On the Specify Online Backup Schedulepage, specify the schedule to generate recovery points from the disk backup. After the recovery point is generated, it is transferred to the Recovery Services vault in Azure. When you are satisfied with the online backup schedule, click Next.
  4. On the Specify Online Retention Policypage, indicate how long you want to retain the backup data in Azure. After the policy is defined, click Next.
  5. On the Summarypage, review the details for your protection group members and settings, and then click Create Group.

Now you are ready to backup VMware VM using Backup Server v2.

Azure Backup Server v2

Azure Backup is used for backups and DR, and it works with managed disks as well as unmanaged disks. You can create a backup job with time-based backups, easy VM restoration, and backup retention policies.

Azure Backup for VMware

The following table is a summary of the solutions available for DR.

Scenario Automatic replication DR solution
Premium SSD disks

Managed disks

Local (locally redundant storage)

Cross region (read-access geo-redundant storage)

Azure Backup

Azure Backup Server

Unmanaged LRS and GRS Local (locally redundant storage)

Cross region (geo-redundant storage)

Azure Backup

Azure Backup Server

This article illustrates on how to use Azure Backup Server v2 to backup on-premises and Azure Workloads. Though Azure Backup Server shares much of the same functionality as DPM. Azure Backup Server does not back up to tape, nor does it integrate with System Center. Azure Backup Server is a dedicated role. Do not run any other application or role with the Azure Backup Server.

 

 

You can deploy Azure Backup Server from the Azure marketplace or on a On-premises server. The requirement to deploy Azure Backup server on a on-prem infrastructure is to have the below OS.

Operating System Platform SKU
Windows Server 2016 and latest SPs 64 bit Standard, Datacenter
Windows Server 2012/R2 and latest SPs 64 bit Standard, Datacenter,

Microsoft recommends you start with a gallery image of Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter or Windows Server 2016 Datacenter to create a Azure Backup Server. Here are the steps, you need to go through to deploy Azure Backup server.

Step1: Install Windows Virtual Machine from the Marketplace

  1. Sign in to the Azure portal at https://portal.azure.com.
  2. Choose Create a resource in the upper left-hand corner of the Azure portal.
  3. In the search box above the list of Azure Marketplace resources, search for and select Windows Server 2016 Datacenter, then choose Create.
  4. Provide a VM name, such as myVM, leave the disk type as SSD, then provide a username, such as azureuser. The password must be at least 12 characters long and meet the defined complexity requirements.
  5. Choose to Create newresource group, then provide a name, such as myResourceGroup. Choose your Location, then select OK.
  6. Select a size for the VM. You can filter by Compute typeor Disk type, for example. A suggested VM size is D2s_v3. Click Select after you have chosen a size.
  7. On the Settingspage, in Network > Network Security Group > Select public inbound ports, select HTTPand RDP (3389) from the drop-down. Leave the rest of the defaults and select OK.
  8. On the summary page, select Createto start the VM deployment.
  9. The VM is pinned to the Azure portal dashboard. Once the deployment has completed, the VM summary automatically opens.

Step2: Create Recovery Vault

  1. Sign in to your subscription in the Azure portal.
  2. In the left-hand menu, select All Services.
  3. In the All services dialog, type Recovery Services. As you begin typing, your input filters the list of resources. Once you see it, select Recovery Services vaults.
  4. On the Recovery Services vaultsmenu, select Add. The Recovery Services vaults menu opens. It prompts you to provide information for NameSubscriptionResource group, and Location.
  5. When you are ready to create the Recovery Services vault, click Create.

Step3: Select Appropriate Storage Type

  1. Select your vault to open the vault dashboard and the Settings menu. If the Settingsmenu doesn’t open, click All settings in the vault dashboard.
  2. On the Settingsmenu, click Backup Infrastructure > Backup Configuration to open the Backup Configuration On the Backup Configuration menu, choose the storage replication option for your vault.
  3. Select LRS or GRS type storage.

Step4: Download Backup Software

  1. Sign in to the Azure portal.
  2. click Browse.In the list of resources, type Recovery Services.
  3. As you begin typing, the list will filter based on your input. When you see Recovery Services vaults,
  4. From the list of Recovery Services vaults, select a vault.
  5. The Settingsblade opens up by default. If it is closed, click on Settings to open the settings blade.
  6. Click Backupto open the Getting Started wizard. In the Getting Started with backup blade that opens, Backup Goals will be auto-selected.
  7. In the Backup Goalblade, from the Where is your workload running menu, select On-premises.
  8. From the What do you want to backup?drop-down menu, select the workloads you want to protect using Azure Backup Server, and then click OK.
  9. In the Prepare infrastructureblade that opens, click the Download links for Install Azure Backup Server and Download vault credentials. You use the vault credentials during registration of Azure Backup Server to the recovery services vault. The links take you to the Download Center where the software package can be downloaded.
  10. Select all the files and click Next. Download all the files coming in from the Microsoft Azure Backup download page, and place all the files in the same folder.

Step5: Extract Software Package

After you’ve downloaded all the files, click MicrosoftAzureBackupInstaller.exe. This will start the Microsoft Azure Backup Setup Wizard to extract the setup files to a location specified by you. Continue through the wizard and click on the Extract button to begin the extraction process.

Step 6: Install Software Package

  1. Click Microsoft Azure Backupto launch the setup wizard.
  2. On the Welcome screen click the Next This takes you to the Prerequisite Checkssection. On this screen, click Check to determine if the hardware and software prerequisites for Azure Backup Server have been met. If all prerequisites are met successfully, you will see a message indicating that the machine meets the requirements. Click on the Next button.
  3. Microsoft Azure Backup Server requires SQL Server Standard. Further,the Azure Backup Server installation package comes bundled with the appropriate SQL Server binaries needed if you do not wish to use your own SQL. When starting with a new Azure Backup Server installation, you should pick the option Install new Instance of SQL Server with this Setupand click the Check and Install Once the prerequisites are successfully installed, click Next.
  4. Provide a location for the installation of Microsoft Azure Backup server files and click Next.
  5. Provide a strong password for restricted local user accounts and click Next.
  6. Select whether you want to use Microsoft Updateto check for updates and click Next.
  7. Review the Summary of Settingsand click Install.
  8. The installation happens in phases. In the first phase the Microsoft Azure Recovery Services Agent is installed on the server. The wizard also checks for Internet connectivity. If Internet connectivity is available you can proceed with installation, if not, you need to provide proxy details to connect to the Internet.
  9. Once registration of the Microsoft Azure Backup server successfully completes, the overall setup wizard proceeds to the installation and configuration of SQL Server and the Azure Backup Server components. Once the SQL Server component installation completes, the Azure Backup Server components are installed.
  10. When the installation step has completed, the product’s desktop icons will have been created as well. Just double-click the icon to launch the product.

Step7: Add a Data Disk to Azure Backup Server

  1. Log on to Azure Portal. In the menu on the left, click Virtual Machines.
  2. Select the virtual machine from the list.
  3. On the virtual machine page, click Disks.
  4. On the Diskspage, click + Add data disk.
  5. In the drop-down for the new disk, select Create disk.
  6. In the Create managed diskpage, type in a name for the disk and adjust the other settings as necessary. When you are done, click Create.
  7. In the Diskspage, click Save to save the new disk configuration for the VM.
  8. After Azure creates the disk and attaches it to the virtual machine, the new disk is listed in the virtual machine’s disk settings under Data disks.

Step8: Initialise the Disk of the Azure Backup Server

  1. Connect to the VM.
  2. Click the start menu inside the VM and type mscand hit Enter. Disk Management snap-in opens.
  3. Disk Management recognizes that you have a new, un-initialized disk and the Initialize Diskwindow pops up.
  4. Make sure the new disk is selected and click OKto initialize it.

Step9: Create a Storage Pool for Azure Backup Server

  1. Navigating to the Storage Pools page in Server Manager
  2. Launch Server Manager and navigate to the “File and Storage Services” page.
  3. Navigate to the Storage Pools page. Refresh the UI by clicking on the Refresh button.
  4. Logon as a user with admin privileges to your server, launch Server Manager, and then navigate to the “Storage Pools” page within the File and Storage Services Role.
  5. Right-click the “Available Disks” pool for the Storage Spaces subsystem and launch the New Storage Pool Wizard.
  6. Launch the New Storage Pool Wizard from the TASKS list.
  7. In the New Storage Pool Wizard, enter desired pool name and optional description. Make sure that you have selected the Primordial pool for the Storage Spaces subsystem.
  8. Select the number of disks needed for pool creation. If you want to designate a physical disk as a hot spare, then select the “Hot Spare” allocation type.
  9. Confirm the selected settings and initiate pool creation by selecting “Create” on the “Confirm selections” page.

Step10: Create a Virtual Disk

  1. Right-click the concrete pool that you just created (the pool where type value is Storage Pool), and then launch the New Virtual Disk Wizard.
  2. In the New Virtual Disk Wizard, make sure that you have selected the appropriate pool. Enter the desired virtual disk name and optional description.
  3. Select the desired storage layout and provisioning scheme as per your storage requirements.
  4. On the “Specify the size of the virtual disk” page, enter the desired size for the new virtual disk or pick the “Maximum size” option.
  • If you pick the “Maximum size” option, the system will try to create the largest size possible for the virtual disk.
  • If you select the check box for “Create the largest virtual disk possible, up to the specified size” while specifying the size then the system will try to create the largest size possible for the virtual disk up to the requested size.
  • It is also important to note that the value showing up as the storage pool free space (in our example 43.8GB) shows the actual free allocation the pool has overall. For cases with a fixed provisioning of a non-simple storage layout such as Mirror or Parity, when defining the size of the virtual disk, you have to take into account the overhead of storage needed to create the extra copies of the virtual disks extents for resiliency. As a basic example, with the 43.8GB free space in the pool, creating a 30GB mirrored virtual disk is not possible since it will take at least 60GB of free space in the pool to create a mirrored virtual disk to hold the two copies of the mirrored data.
  1. Confirm the settings and initiate virtual disk creation by selecting “Create” on the “Confirm selections” page.

Step11: Add Disk to Azure Backup Server

  1. Launch  Azure Backup Server and locate Disk Storage and Add – Select the disk, you want to add
  2. Once Added, this disk will be formatted with REFS file system and the storage will be available for Azure Backup Server.

Now you are ready to use Azure Backup Server. On my next blog, I will explain how to backup VMware VM using Azure Backup Server.

Nimble Hybrid Storage for Azure VM

Microsoft Azure can be integrated with Nimble Cloud-Connected Storage based on the Nimble Storage Predictive Flash platform via Microsoft Azure ExpressRoute or Equinix Cloud Exchange connectivity solutions.

The Nimble storage is located in Equinix colocation facilities at proximity to Azure data centres to deliver fast, low-latency performance.

Key Features:

  • 9997% uptime and reliability over thousands of systems deployed in production.
  • Triple-parity RAID protection, data durability is improved by over 1,000x compared to traditional RAID6 protection.
  • Accelerates performance and optimises capacity via ExpressRoute and Equinix Cloud Exchange
  • On-Demand pay-for-what-you-use pricing model. Cloud Volumes pricing will start at $0.10/GB/month
  • Data mobility between Azure Cloud and Nimble Storage
  • Nimble’s Cloud Volumes (NCV) store block data for use by Azure compute instances
  • Data protection using Veeam Availability Suite or Veritas NetBackup

Direct Connectivity to Azure

Azure virtual machines connect directly to block storage volumes running on Nimble arrays. This provides access to secure, feature-rich and high-performance storage over a fast and low-latency connection.

Equinix Cloud Exchange provides further flexibility with Azure and Nimble storage connectivity by providing self-service on-demand provisioning and switchable virtual connections in the colocation facility. You can achieve this functionality using Nimble native tooling.

Hybrid Cloud Model

For hybrid clouds where you do need to move data from your on-premise storage to your cloud-connected storage Nimble’s efficient data replication ensures all data is compressed and only changed data is sent to minimise bandwidth requirements.

Nimble’s efficient data replication allows you to gain efficiency, reduce data transfer times, moreover, reduce network costs by avoiding massive data migrations to and from your on-premise storage or private cloud to the public cloud.

Regulatory Compliance

Breakdown one of the top barriers to cloud adoption. You always own and control your data when you use Nimble Cloud-Connected Storage allowing you to address data security as well as corporate compliance or governance requirements.

Low-Cost Disaster Recovery Solution

Pay for disaster recovery only when you need it instead of keeping fully operational secondary servers up at all times. Leverage the ability to quickly turn on Azure virtual machines to enable your DR site for drills and actual failures and turn them off when you are done. All the while Nimble’s efficient data replication ensures your DR data is up-to-date and secure.

Dev/Test Environments

If your production environment is on-premise, it is difficult to leverage the cloud for Dev/test since you need to move data back and forth between the cloud. With Nimble Cloud-Connected Storage, instant snapshots are made of your production environment and zero-copy clones of that data are immediately available for Azure virtual machines that can be spun up quickly for dev/test.

Secure Private Storage for the Public Cloud Apps

Stop debating which applications can move to the cloud due to concerns about Security, privacy performance, and reliability. With Nimble Cloud-Connected Storage, you will always control your data while taking advantage of Azure virtual machines for cloud compute.

Other use cases such as big data analytics and application cloud bursting can leverage Nimble Cloud-Connected Storage to gain agility, improve performance, while maintaining sovereignty and ownership of your data.

 

 

 

Configuring EMC DD Boost with Veeam Availability Suite

This article provides a tour of the configuration steps required to integrate EMC Data Domain System with Veeam Availability Suite 9 as well as provides benefits of using EMC DD Boost for backup application.

Data Domain Boost (DD Boost) software provides advanced integration with backup and enterprise applications for increased performance and ease of use. DD Boost distributes parts of the deduplication process to the backup server or application clients, enabling client-side deduplication for faster, more efficient backup and recovery. All Data Domain systems can be configured as storage destinations for leading backup and archiving applications using NFS, CIFS, Boost, or VTL protocols.

The following applications work with a Data Domain system using the DD Boost interface: EMC Avamar, EMC NetWorker, Oracle RMAN, Quest vRanger, Symantec Veritas NetBackup (NBU), Veeam and Backup Exec. In this example, we will be using Veeam Availability Suite version 9.

Data Domain Systems for Service Provider

Data Domain Secure Multitenancy (SMT) is the simultaneous hosting by a service provider for more than one consumer (Tenant) or workload (Applications, Exchange, Standard VMs, Structured Data, Unstructured Data, Citrix VMs).

SMT provides the ability to securely isolate many users and workloads in a shared infrastructure, so that the activities of one Tenant are not apparent or visible to the other Tenants. A Tenant is a consumer (business unit, department, or customer) who maintains a persistent presence in a hosted environment.

Basic Configuration requirements are:

  • Enable SMT in the DD System
  • Role Based Access Control in DD Systems
  • Tenant Self-Service in the DD Systems
  • A Tenant is created on the DD Management Center and/or DD system.
  • A Tenant Unit is created on a DD system for the Tenant.
  • One or more MTrees are created to meet the storage requirements for the Tenant’s various types of backups.
  • The newly created MTrees are added to the Tenant Unit.
  • Backup applications are configured to send each backup to its configured Tenant Unit MTree.

Prerequisites:

  1. Backup Server

Physical Server- Fibre Channel or iSCSI

OR

Virtual Server- Fibre Channel with N-Port Virtualization or NPIV or Pass-through Storage or iSCSI

  1. Backup Software

Backup Application, DD Boost Library, DD Boost-over-FC Transport

  1. Storage Area Network

Fibre Channel or iSCSI

  1. Data Domain System

DD Boost Service

DD Boost-over-FC Server

SCSI Commands over FC

SCSI Processor Devices

  1. Virtual Infrastructure

Hyper-v Server cluster & System Center Virtual Machine Manager OR

VMware vCenter with vSphere Hosts

Designing DD Boost for resiliency & availability

The Data Domain System broadcast itself to the backup server using one or more path physically or virtually connected. The design of entire systems depend on the Data Domain sizing on how you connect Data Domain with backup server(s), how many backup jobs will be running, size of backup, de-duplication, data retention and frequency of data restore. A typical backup solution should include the following environment.

  • Backup server with 2 initiator HBA ports (A and B)
  • Data Domain System has 2 FC target endpoints (C and D)
  • Fibre Channel Fabric zoning is configured such that both initiator HBA ports can access both FC target endpoints
  • Data Domain system is configured with a SCSI target access group containing:
  • Both FC target endpoints on the Data Domain System
  • Dual Fabric for fail over and availability
  • Multiple physical and logical Ethernet for availability and fail over

Examples of Sizing

To calculate the maximum simultaneous connection to Data Domain Fibre Channel System (DFC) from all Backup servers. DFC device (D) is the number of devices to be advertised to the initiator of the backup server(s). Lets say we have 1 backup server, single data domain systems, the backup server is running 100 backup jobs.

DFC Device Count D= (minimum 2 X S)/128

J=1 Backup Server x 100 Backup Jobs=100

C= 1 (Single DD System)

S=JXC (100X1)=100

D=2*100/128 = 1.56 rounded up 2

Therefore, all DFC groups on the Data Domain system must be configured with 2 devices.

Step1: Preparing DD System

Step2: Managing system licenses

  1. Select Administration > Licenses> Click Add Licenses.
  2. On the License Window, type or paste the license keys. Type each key on its own line or separate each key by a space or comma (DD System Manager automatically places each key on a new line)
  3. Click Add. The added licenses display in the Added license list.

OR

  1. In System Manager, select Protocols > DD Boost > Settings. If the Status indicates that DD Boost is not licensed, click Add
  2. License and enter a valid license in the Add License Key dialog box.

Step3: Setting up CIFS Protocol

  1. On the DD System Manager Navigation>click Protocols > CIFS.
  2. In the CIFS Status area, click Enable.

Step4: Remove Anonymous Log on

  1. Select Protocols > CIFS > Configuration.
  2. In the Options area, click Configure Options.
  3. To restrict anonymous connections, click the checkbox of the Enable option in the

Step4: Restrict Anonymous Connections area.

  1. In the Log Level area, click the drop-down list to select the level number 1.
  2. In the Server Signing area, select Enabled to enable server signing

Step5: Specifying DD Boost user names

The following user will be used to connect to DD boost from backup software.

  1. Select Protocols > DD Boost.
  2. Select Add, above the Users with DD Boost Access list.
  3. On the Add User dialog appears. To select an existing user, select the user name in the drop-down list. EMC recommends that you select a user name with management role privileges set to none.
  4. To create and select a new user, select Create a new Local User and Enter the password twice in the appropriate fields. Click Add.

Step6: Enabling DD Boost

  1. Select Protocols > DD Boost > Settings.
  2. Click Enable in the DD Boost Status area.
  3. Select an existing user name from the menu then complete the wizard.

Step7: Creating a storage unit

  1. Select Protocols > DD Boost > Storage Units.
  2. Click Create. The Create Storage Unit dialog box is displayed.
  3. Enter the storage unit name in the Name box e.g. DailyRepository1
  4. Select an existing username that will have access to this storage unit. EMC recommends that you select a username with management role privileges set to none. The user must be configured in the backup application to connect to the Data Domain system.
  5. To set storage space restrictions to prevent a storage unit from consuming excess space: enter either a soft or hard limit quota setting, or both a hard and soft limit.
  6. Click Create.
  7. Repeat the above steps for MonthlyRepository1 each Data Domain Boost-enabled system.

Step8: Encrypting Communication between Backup Server and Data Domain (Optional)

Generate an advanced certificate from Active Directory Certificate services and install into the Data Domain DD Boost. You must install the same certificate into the backup servers so that both data domain and data domain client which is backup server can talk to each via encrypted certificate.

  1. Start DD System Manager on the system to which you want to add a host certificate.
  2. Select Protocols > DD Boost > More Tasks > Manage Certificates….
  3. In the Host Certificate area, click Add.
  4. To add a host certificate enclosed in a .p12 file, Select I want to upload the certificate as a .p12 file. Type the password in the Password box.
  5. Click Browse and select the host certificate file to upload to the system.
  6. Click Add.
  7. To add a host certificate enclosed in a .pem file, Select I want to upload the public key as .pem file and use a generated private key. And Click Browse and select the host certificate file to upload to the system.
  8. Click Add.

DD Boost client access and encryption

  1. Select Protocols > DD Boost > Settings.
  2. In the Allowed Clients section, click Create. The Add Allowed Client dialog appears.
  3. Enter the hostname of the client. This can be a fully-qualified domain name (e.g. Backupserver1.domain.com) or a hostname with a wildcard (e.g. *.domain.com).
  4. Select the Encryption Strength. The options are None (no encryption), Medium (AES128-SHA1), or High (AES256-SHA1).
  5. Select the Authentication Mode. The options are One Way, Two Way.
  6. Click OK.

Step9:Configuring DD Boost over Fibre Channel

  1. Select Protocols > DD Boost > Fibre Channel.
  2. Click Enable to enable Fibre Channel transport.
  3. To change the DD Boost Fibre Channel server name from the default (hostname), click Edit, enter a new server name, and click OK.
  1. Select Protocols > DD Boost > Storage Units to create a storage unit (if not already

created by the application).

  1. Install the DD Boost API/plug-in (if necessary, based on the application).

Step10: Configuring storage for DD Extended Retention (Optional)

Before you proceed with Extended Retention you must add required license on the DD System.

  1. Select Hardware > Storage tab.
  2. In the Overview tab, select Configure Storage. In the Configure Storage tab, select the storage to be added from the Available Storage list.
  3. Select the appropriate Tier Configuration (or Active or Retention) from the menu.
  4. Select the checkbox for the Shelf to be added.
  5. Click the Add to Tier button. Click OK to add the storage.

Step11: Configure a Veeam backup repository

  1. To create an EMC Data Domain Boost-enabled backup repository, navigate to the Backup Infrastructure section of the user interface, then select Backup Repositories and right-click to select Add Backup Repository.

DDBoost

  1. The next step is to select the repository type, De-duplicating storage appliance. Type the Name of the DD Systems, Choose Fibre Channel or Ethernet Option, add credentials to connect to DD System and Gateway to connect to DD System. To be able to connect Veeam Backup server to the DD System using Fibre Channel you must add DD System & Veeam Backup server in the same SAN zone. You also need to enable FC on the DD System. To be able to connect Veeam Backup Server using Ethernet Veeam backup Server and DD System must be in same VLAN or for multi-VLAN you must enable unrestricted communication between VLANs.
  2. On the next screen, select the Storage Unit of the DD System to be used by the Veeam Server as repository, leave concurrent connection as default
  3. On the Next screen, enable vPower NFS, complete the wizard

Step12: Configure Veeam Backup Job & Backup Copy Job

The critical decision on backup jobs will be whether to do an active full backup or leverage synthetic full backups. Veeam Backup Job Creation GuideVeeam Backup Copy Job Creation Guide

Here is short business case of backup type.

Veeam Backup Options:

  1. Active Full- Financial or health sector prefer to keep a monthly full backup of data and retain certain period of time for corporate compliance and satisfying external auditor’s  requirement to keep data off-site for a period of time.
  2. Synthetic Full- A standard practice to keep synthetic full at all time to reduce storage cost and recovery time objective for any organization.

Sythetic

  • For most environments, Veeam recommends to do synthetic full backups when leveraging EMC Data Domain Boost. This will save stress on primary storage for the vSphere and Hyper-V VMs and the Boost-enabled synthesizing is very fast.
  • For a Backup Copy job using GFS retention (Monthly, Weekly, Quarterly and/or Annual restore points), the gateway server must be closest to the Data Domain server, since the Backup Copy job frequently involves an offsite transfer. When the Data Domain server is designated in the repository setup, ensure that consideration is given to the gateway server if it is being used off site.
  • Backup job timed out value must be higher than 30 minutes to be able to retry the job if it is to fail for any reason

DD System Option:

  • A virtual synthetic full backup is the combination of the last full (synthetic or full) backup and all subsequent incremental backups. Virtual synthetics are enabled by default.
  • The synthetic full backups are faster when Data Domain Boost is enabled for a repository
  • DD Boost reduces backup transformation time by less than 80% of total time if DD Boost was not used.
  • The first job has the bulk of the blocks of the vSphere or Hyper-V VM on the DD Boost Storage Unit, it will only need to transfer metadata and any possible changed blocks. This can be a significant improvement on the active full backup process when there is a fast source storage resource in place.
  • With DD Boost, multi-link provides fail over & resiliency. DD Boost also provides parallel processing of concurrent jobs to DD Boost Storage unit.
  1. To display the DD Boost option settings, select Protocols > DD Boost > Settings >Advanced Options.
  2. To change the settings, select More Tasks > Set Options. Select or deselect any option to be enabled.
  3. Click OK.

Understand “X as a Service” or get stuck in “Pizza box as a Service”

“X or Anything as a Service” is an acronym used by many cloud provider and offering almost end to end services to a business. The most traditional use of “X” are Software as a Service (XaaS), Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), Desktop as a Service (DaaS) and Platform as a Service (PaaS). The other use of “X” are Storage as a Service (SaaS), Communications as a Service (CaaS), Backup as a Service (BaaS), Disaster Recovery as a Service (DRaaS), Network as a Service (NaaS) and Monitoring as a Service (MaaS).

As a CIO or CTO of an organization have you had a business case of your organisation how your organization is benefited from “Anything as a Service”? How does it translate your business in terms of consumption of information technology if it was on premises comparing off the premises or so called cloud. The most service provider compete with each other getting a piece of pie from these cloud computing era. However to cut cost these provider going below the bench mark and taking the cloud into “Craig list” where everything offered cheap scarifying quality making it “Pizza box as a Service”.

Here are some guidelines for you to measure your workload, services and application before signing up with a cloud provider.

  1. What type of services or application you would like to migrate to cloud?
  2. Are you migrating tier 1 application to cloud?
  3. What is your peak demand of IO or IOPS for all virtual infrastructure, VDI, services and application?
  4. What is peak period latency requirement for an application and a service of your organisation?
  5. What is your peak bandwidth requirements?
  6. What is the up time requirements?
  7. What is SLA and SLR of your business with the service provider?
  8. Do you have penalty clause with the service provider?
  9. What is your RPO and RTO to business when choosing DRaaS?
  10. What is corporate compliance and data retention policy when choosing BaaS?
  11. Do you have good/great user experience matrix in your organisation?

Once you have answered these question, gather data from existing infrastructure and analyse your requirement than it’s time for you to;

  1. Prepare a business case for Anything as a Service
  2. Identify option1, option2, option 3 for cloud services
  3. Knowing cloud provider
  • Learn more about cloud provider hosting platform
  • Learn more about cloud provider engineering and support capabilities
  • Learn more about cloud provider outbound bandwidth and redundancy of network infrastructure
  • Learn more about redundancy of storage infrastructure of cloud provider
  • Who are the hardware and software partners of cloud provider
  • How user friendly is the management portal of cloud provider

4. Compare and select potential cloud provider

If you haven’t identified above criteria and you are aware that you signed up with a cloud provider who simply patch together a 1Gbe network, 1U rack server and Dell Compellent storage with few SATA disk than you signed for a “Pizza box as a service”. You know that your 2WD car is heading towards off road and you are about to get stuck in mud.

When comes decision making time, count every factor into account and make a decision that provide an outcome you want instead of cheap pizza box as a service which neither fulfil your requirement nor fulfil SLA of your business. Remember it’s about your business not the business of cloud provider.

Veeam integrate with EMC and NetApp Storage Snapshots!

Taking a VMware snapshots and Hyper-v checkpoint can produce a serious workload on VM performance, and it can take considerable effort by sys admin to overcome this technical challenge and meet the required service level agreement. Most Veeam user will run their backup and replication after hours considering impact to the production environment, but this can’t be your only backup solution. What if storage itself goes down, or gets corrupted? Even with storage-based replication, you need to take your data out of the single fault domain. This is why many customers prefer to additionally make true backups stored on different storage. Never to store production and backup on to a same storage.

Veeam1

Source: Veeam

Now you can take advantage of storage snapshot. Veeam decided to work with storage vendor such as EMC and NetApp to integrate production storage, leveraging storage snapshot functionality to reduce the impact on the environment from snapshot/checkpoint removal during backup and replication.

Supported Storage

  • EMC VNX/VNXe
  • NetApp FAS
  • NetApp FlexArray (V-Series)
  • NetApp Data ONTAP Edge VSA
  • HP 3PAR StoreServ
  • HP StoreVirtual
  • HP StoreVirtual VSA
  • IBM N series

Unsupported Storage

  • Dell Compellent

NOTE: My own experience with HP StoreVirtual and HP 3PAR are awful. I had to remove HP StoreVirtual from production store and introduce other fibre channel to cope with workload. Even though Veeam tested snapshot mechanism with HP, I would recommend avoid HP StoreVirtual if you have high IO workload.

Benefits

Veeam suggest that you can get lower RPOs and lower RTOs with Backup from Storage Snapshots and Veeam Explorer for Storage Snapshots.

Veeam and EMC together allow you to:

  • Minimize impact on production VMs
  • Rapidly create backups from EMC VNX or VNXe storage snapshots up to 20 times faster than the competition
  • Easily recover individual items in two minutes or less, without staging or intermediate steps

As a result of integrating Veeam with EMC, you can backup 20 times faster and restore faster using Veeam Explorer. Hence users can achieve much lower RPOs (recovery point objectives) and lower RTOs (recovery time objectives) with minimal impact on production VMs.

How it works

Veeam Backup & Replication works with EMC and NetApp storage, along with VMware to create backups and replicas from storage snapshots in the following way.

Veeam2

Source: Veeam

The backup and replication job:

  1. Analyzes which VMs in the job have disks on supported storage.
  2. Triggers a vSphere snapshot for all VMs located on the same storage volume. (As a part of a vSphere snapshot, Veeam’s application-aware processing of each VM is performed normally.)
  3. Triggers a snapshot of said storage volume once all VM snapshots have been created.
  4. Retrieves the CBT information for VM snapshots created on step 2.
  5. Immediately triggers the removal of the vSphere snapshots on the production VMs.
  6. Mounts the storage snapshot to one of the backup proxies connected into the storage fabric.
  7. Reads new and changed virtual disk data blocks directly from the storage snapshot and transports them to the backup repository or replica VM.
  8. Triggers the removal storage snapshot once all VMs have been backed up.

VMs run off snapshots for the shortest possible time (Subject to storage array- EMC works better), while jobs obtain data from VM snapshot files preserved in the storage snapshot. As the result, VM snapshots do not get a chance to grow large and can be committed very quickly without overloading production storage with extended merge procedure, as is the case with classic techniques for backing up from VM snapshots.

Integration with EMC storage will bring great benefit to customers who wants to take advantage of their storage array. Veeam Availability Suite v9 will provide the chance to reduce IO on to your storage array and bring your SLA under control.

References:

Backup from storage snapshots

Integration with emc storage snapshot

Veeam integrates with emc snapshots

New Veeam availability suite version 9