Migrate Amazon Web Services (AWS) EC2 VM to Azure Cloud

In my previous blog, I have written how to migrate workloads from VMware to Azure Cloud.  In this tutorial, I am going to elaborate you how to migrate Amazon Web Services (AWS) EC2 virtual machines (VMs) to Azure VMs by using Azure Site Recovery.

AWStoAzure

Supported Workloads Which can be migrated:

  1. Windows Server 2016 or later version
  2. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.7

Prerequisites

  1. The Mobility service must be installed on each VM that you want to replicate. Site Recovery installs this service automatically when you enable replication for the VM.
  2. For non-domain joined Windows VMs, disable Remote User Access control on the local machine at the registry, under HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\System, add the DWORD entry LocalAccountTokenFilterPolicy and set the value to 1.
  3. A separate VM in AWS subscriptions to use as Site Recovery Configuration Server. This instance must be running Windows Server 2012 R2.

Credential Requirements

  1. A root on the source Linux server
  2. A Domain Admin Credentials for Windows VM.
  3. A Local Admin Account for non-domain joined VM.

Prepare Azure resources (Target)

Step1: Create a Storage Account

  1. In the Azure portal, in the left menu, select Create a resource > Storage > Storage account.
  2. Create a Storage Account in your region.

Step2: Create a Recovery Vault

  1. In the Azure portal, select All services. Search for and then select Recovery Services vaults.
  2. Add new Recovery Vault in your region.

Step3: Add a separate network for migrated VM

  1. In the Azure portal, select Create a resource > Networking > Virtual network.
  2. Add new Network and Address Space.

Step4: Prepare Recovery Goal

  1. On your vault page in the Azure portal, in the Getting Started section, select Site Recovery, and then select Prepare Infrastructure.
  2. Create a protection goal from On-prem to Azure.
  3. When you’re done, select OK to move to the next section.

Step5: Create a Replication Policy

  1. To create a new replication policy, click Site Recovery infrastructure > Replication Policies > +Replication Policy. In Create replication policy, specify a policy name.
  2. In RPO threshold, specify the recovery point objective (RPO) limit. This value specifies how often data recovery points are created. An alert is generated if continuous replication exceeds this limit.
  3. In Recovery point retention, specify how long (in hours) the retention window is for each recovery point. Replicated VMs can be recovered to any point in a window. Up to 24 hours retention is supported for machines replicated to premium storage, and 72 hours for standard storage.
  4. In App-consistent snapshot frequency, specify how often (in minutes) recovery points containing application-consistent snapshots will be created. Click OK to create the policy.

Prepare Source Environment (AWS)

Step6: Prepare Source ASR Configuration Server

  1. Log on to the EC2 instance where you would like to install Configuration Server
  1. Configure the proxy on the EC2 instance VM you’re using as the configuration server so that it can access the service URLs.
  2. Download Microsoft Azure Site Recovery Unified Setup. You can download it to your local machine and then copy it to the VM you’re using as the configuration server.
  3. Select the Download button to download the vault registration key. Copy the downloaded file to the VM you’re using as the configuration server.
  4. On the VM, right-click the installer you downloaded for Microsoft Azure Site Recovery Unified Setup, and then select Run as administrator.
  5. Under Before You Begin, select Install the configuration server and process server, and then select Next.
  6. In Third-Party Software License, select I accept the third-party license agreement, and then select Next.
  7. In Registration, select Browse, and then go to where you put the vault registration key file. Select Next.
  8. In Internet Settings, select Connect to Azure Site Recovery without a proxy server, and then select Next.
  9. The Prerequisites Check page runs checks for several items. When it’s finished, select Next.
  10. In MySQL Configuration, provide the required passwords, and then select Next.
  11. In Environment Details, select No. You don’t need to protect VMware machines. Then, select Next.
  12. In Install Location, select Next to accept the default.
  13. In Network Selection, select Next to accept the default.
  14. In Summary, select Install. Installation Progress shows you information about the installation process. When it’s finished, select Finish. A window displays a message about a reboot. Select OK. Next, a window displays a message about the configuration server connection passphrase. Copy the passphrase to your clipboard and save it somewhere safe.
  15. On the VM, run cspsconfigtool.exe to create one or more management accounts on the configuration server. Make sure that the management accounts have administrator permissions on the EC2 instances that you want to migrate.

Step7: Enable Replication for a AWS EC2 VM

  1. Click Replicate application > Source.
  2. In Source, select the configuration server.
  3. In Machine type, select Physical machines.
  4. Select the process server (the configuration server). Then click OK.
  5. In Target, select the subscription and the resource group in which you want to create the Azure VMs after failover. Choose the deployment model that you want to use in Azure (classic or resource management).
  6. Select the Azure storage account you want to use for replicating data.
  7. Select the Azure network and subnet to which Azure VMs will connect, when they’re created after failover.
  8. Select Configure now for selected machines, to apply the network setting to all machines you select for protection. Select Configure later to select the Azure network per machine.
  9. In Physical Machines, and click +Physical machine. Specify the name and IP address. Select the operating system of the machine you want to replicate. It takes a few minutes for the servers to be discovered and listed.
  10. In Properties > Configure properties, select the account that will be used by the process server to automatically install the Mobility service on the machine.
  11. In Replication settings > Configure replication settings, verify that the correct replication policy is selected.
  12. Click Enable Replication. You can track progress of the Enable Protection job in Settings > Jobs > Site Recovery Jobs. After the Finalize Protection job runs the machine is ready for failover.

Test failover at Azure Portal

Step8: Test a Failover

  1. On the page for your vault, go to Protected items > Replicated Items. Select the VM, and then select Test Failover.
  2. Select a recovery point to use for the failover:
    • Latest processed: Fails over the VM to the latest recovery point that was processed by Site Recovery. The time stamp is shown. With this option, no time is spent processing data, so it provides a low recovery time objective (RTO).
    • Latest app-consistent: This option fails over all VMs to the latest app-consistent recovery point. The time stamp is shown.
    • Custom: Select any recovery point.
  3. In Test Failover, select the target Azure network to which Azure VMs will be connected after failover occurs. This should be the network you created in Prepare Azure resources.
  4. Select OK to begin the failover. To track progress, select the VM to view its properties. Or you can select the Test Failover job on the page for your vault. To do this, select Monitoring and reports > Jobs > Site Recovery jobs.
  5. When the failover finishes, the replica Azure VM appears in the Azure portal. To view the VM, select Virtual Machines. Ensure that the VM is the appropriate size, that it’s connected to the right network, and that it’s running.
  6. You should now be able to connect to the replicated VM in Azure.
  7. To delete Azure VMs that were created during the test failover, select Cleanup test failover in the recovery plan. In Notes, record and save any observations associated with the test failover.

Migrate an AWS EC2 Instance to Azure Cloud

Step9: Trigger Azure Migration

  1. In Protected items > Replicated items, select the AWS instances, and then select Failover.
  2. In Failover, select a Recovery Point to failover to. Select the latest recovery point.
  3. Select Shut down machine before beginning failover if you want Site Recovery to attempt to do a shutdown of source virtual machines before triggering the failover. Failover continues even if shutdown fails. You can follow the failover progress on the Jobs
  4. Ensure that the VM appears in Replicated items.
  5. Right-click each VM, and then select Complete Migration. This finishes the migration process, stops replication for the AWS VM, and stops Site Recovery billing for the VM.

 

Backup VMware Server Workloads to Azure Backup Server

In my previous article, I explained how to install and configure Azure Backup Server. This article explains how to configure Azure Backup Server to help protect VMware  Server workloads. I am assuming that you already have Azure Backup Server installed. Azure Backup Server can back up, or help protect, VMware vCenter Server version 5.5 and later version.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step1: Create a secure connection to the vCenter Server

By default, Azure Backup Server communicates with each vCenter Server via an HTTPS channel. To turn on the secure communication, we recommend that you install the VMware Certificate Authority (CA) certificate on Azure Backup Server.

To fix this issue, and create a secure connection, download the trusted root CA certificates.

  1. In the browser on Azure Backup Server, enter the URL to the vSphere Web Client. The vSphere Web Client login page appears. Example, https://vcenter.domain.com

At the bottom of the information for administrators and developers, locate the Download trusted root CA certificates link.

  1. Click Download trusted root CA certificates.

The vCenter Server downloads a file to your local computer. The file’s name is named download. Depending on your browser, you receive a message that asks whether to open or save the file.

  1. Save the file to a location on Azure Backup Server. When you save the file, add the .zip file name extension. The file is a .zip file that contains the information about the certificates. With the .zip extension, you can use the extraction tools.
  2. Right-click zip, and then select Extract Allto extract the contents. The CRL file has an extension that begins with a sequence like .r0 or .r1. The CRL file is associated with a certificate.
  3. In the certsfolder, right-click the root certificate file, and then click Rename. Change the root certificate’s extension to .crt. When you’re asked if you’re sure you want to change the extension, click Yes or OK.  Right-click the root certificate and from the pop-up menu, select Install Certificate. The Certificate Import Wizard dialog box appears.
  4. In the Certificate Import Wizarddialog box, select Local Machine as the destination for the certificate, and then click Next to continue.

If you’re asked if you want to allow changes to the computer, click Yes or OK, to all the changes.

  1. On the Certificate Storepage, select Place all certificates in the following store, and then click Browse to choose the certificate store.

The Select Certificate Store dialog box appears.

  1. Select Trusted Root Certification Authoritiesas the destination folder for the certificates, and then click OK. The Trusted Root Certification Authorities folder is confirmed as the certificate store. Click Next.
  2. On the Completing the Certificate Import Wizardpage, verify that the certificate is in the desired folder, and then click Finish.
  3. Sign in to the vCenter Server to confirm that your connection is secure.

If you have secure boundaries within your organization, and don’t want to turn on the HTTPS protocol, use the following procedure to disable the secure communications.

Step2: Disable secure communication protocol

If your organization doesn’t require the HTTPS protocol, use the following steps to disable HTTPS. To disable the default behavior, create a registry key that ignores the default behavior.

  1. Copy and paste the following text into a .txt file.

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Microsoft Data Protection Manager\VMWare]

“IgnoreCertificateValidation”=dword:00000001

  1. Save the file to your Azure Backup Server computer. For the file name, use DisableSecureAuthentication.reg.
  2. Double-click the file to activate the registry entry.

Step3: Create a role and user account on the vCenter Server

To establish the necessary user credentials to back up the vCenter Server workloads, create a role with specific privileges, and then associate the user account with the role.

Azure Backup Server uses a username and password to authenticate with the vCenter Server. Azure Backup Server uses these credentials as authentication for all backup operations.

To add a vCenter Server role and its privileges for a backup administrator:

  1. Sign in to the vCenter Server, and then in the vCenter Server Navigatorpanel, click Administration.
  2. In Administrationselect Roles, and then in the Roles panel click the add role icon (the + symbol). The Create Role dialog box appears.
  3. In the Create Roledialog box, in the Role name box, enter BackupAdminRole. The role name can be whatever you like, but it should be recognizable for the role’s purpose.
  4. Select the privileges for the appropriate version of vCenter, and then click OK. The following table identifies the required privileges for vCenter 6.0 and vCenter 5.5.

When you select the privileges, click the icon next to the parent label to expand the parent and view the child privileges. To select the VirtualMachine privileges, you need to go several levels into the parent child hierarchy. You don’t need to select all child privileges within a parent privilege. After you click OK, the new role appears in the list on the Roles panel.

Privileges for vCenter 6.0 Privileges for vCenter 5.5
Datastore.AllocateSpace Datastore.AllocateSpace
Global.ManageCustomFields Global.ManageCustomerFields
Global.SetCustomFields
Host.Local.CreateVM Network.Assign
Network.Assign
Resource.AssignVMToPool
VirtualMachine.Config.AddNewDisk VirtualMachine.Config.AddNewDisk
VirtualMachine.Config.AdvanceConfig VirtualMachine.Config.AdvancedConfig
VirtualMachine.Config.ChangeTracking VirtualMachine.Config.ChangeTracking
VirtualMachine.Config.HostUSBDevice
VirtualMachine.Config.QueryUnownedFiles
VirtualMachine.Config.SwapPlacement VirtualMachine.Config.SwapPlacement
VirtualMachine.Interact.PowerOff VirtualMachine.Interact.PowerOff
VirtualMachine.Inventory.Create VirtualMachine.Inventory.Create
VirtualMachine.Provisioning.DiskRandomAccess
VirtualMachine.Provisioning.DiskRandomRead VirtualMachine.Provisioning.DiskRandomRead
VirtualMachine.State.CreateSnapshot VirtualMachine.State.CreateSnapshot
VirtualMachine.State.RemoveSnapshot VirtualMachine.State.RemoveSnapshot

Step4: Create a vCenter Server user account and permissions

After the role with privileges is set up, create a user account. The user account has a name and password, which provides the credentials that are used for authentication.

  1. To create a user account, in the vCenter Server Navigatorpanel, click Users and Groups. The vCenter Users and Groups panel appears.
  2. In the vCenter Users and Groupspanel, select the Users tab, and then click the add users icon (the + symbol). The New User dialog box appears.
  3. In the New Userdialog box, add the user’s information and then click OK. In this procedure, the username is BackupAdmin. The new user account appears in the list.
  4. To associate the user account with the role, in the Navigatorpanel, click Global Permissions. In the Global Permissions panel, select the Manage tab, and then click the add icon (the + symbol). The Global Permissions Root – Add Permission dialog box appears.
  5. In the Global Permission Root – Add Permissiondialog box, click Add to choose the user or group.  The Select Users/Groups dialog box appears.
  6. In the Select Users/Groupsdialog box, choose BackupAdmin and then click Add. In Users, the domain\username format is used for the user account. If you want to use a different domain, choose it from the Domain Click OK to add the selected users to the Add Permission dialog box.
  7. Now that you’ve identified the user, assign the user to the role. In Assigned Role, from the drop-down list, select BackupAdminRole, and then click OK. On the Managetab in the Global Permissions panel, the new user account and the associated role appear in the list.

Step6: Establish vCenter Server credentials on Azure Backup Server

  1. To open Azure Backup Server, double-click the icon on the Azure Backup Server desktop.
  2. In the Azure Backup Server console, click Management, click Production Servers, and then on the tool ribbon, click Manage VMware. The Manage Credentialsdialog box appears.
  3. In the Manage Credentialsdialog box, click Add to open the Add Credential dialog box.
  4. In the Add Credentialdialog box, enter a name and a description for the new credential. Then specify the username and password. The name, Contoso Vcenter credential is used to identify the credential in the next procedure. Use the same username and password that is used for the vCenter Server. If the vCenter Server and Azure Backup Server are not in the same domain, in User name, specify the domain.

Click Add to add the new credential to Azure Backup Server. The new credential appears in the list in the Manage Credentials dialog box.

  1. To close the Manage Credentialsdialog box, click the X in the upper-right corner.

Step7: Add the vCenter Server to Azure Backup Server

Production Server Addition Wizard is used to add the vCenter Server to Azure Backup Server. To open Production Server Addition Wizard, complete the following procedure:

  1. In the Azure Backup Server console, click Management, click Production Servers, and then click Add. The Production Server Addition Wizarddialog box appears.
  2. On the Select Production Server typepage, select VMware Servers, and then click Next.
  3. In Server Name/IP Address, specify the fully qualified domain name (FQDN) or IP address of the VMware server. If all the ESXi servers are managed by the same vCenter, you can use the vCenter name.
  4. In SSL Port, enter the port that is used to communicate with the VMware server. Use port 443, which is the default port, unless you know that a different port is required.
  5. In Specify Credential, select the credential that you created earlier.
  6. Click Addto add the VMware server to the list of Added VMware Servers, and then click Next to move to the next page in the wizard.
  7. In the Summarypage, click Add to add the specified VMware server to Azure Backup Server. The VMware server backup is an agentless backup, and the new server is added immediately. The Finishpage shows you the results.

After you add the vCenter Server to Azure Backup Server, the next step is to create a protection group. The protection group specifies the various details for short or long-term retention, and it is where you define and apply the backup policy. The backup policy is the schedule for when backups occur, and what is backed up.

Step8: Configure a protection group

After you check that you have proper storage, use the Create New Protection Group wizard to add VMware virtual machines.

  1. In the Azure Backup Server console, click Protection, and in the tool ribbon, click Newto open the Create New Protection Group wizard.

The Create New Protection Group wizard dialog box appears. Click Next to advance to the Select protection group type page.

  1. On the Select Protection group typepage, select Servers and then click Next. The Select group memberspage appears.
  2. On the Select group memberspage, the available members and the selected members appear. Select the members that you want to protect, and then click Next.

When you select a member, if you select a folder that contains other folders or VMs, those folders and VMs are also selected. The inclusion of the folders and VMs in the parent folder is called folder-level protection. To remove a folder or VM, clear the check box.

  1. On the Select Data Protection Methodpage, enter a name for the protection group. Short-term protection (to disk) and online protection are selected. If you want to use online protection (to Azure), you must use short-term protection to disk. Click Next to proceed to the short-term protection range.
  2. On the Specify Short-Term Goalspage, for Retention Range, specify the number of days that you want to retain recovery points that are stored to disk. If you want to change the time and days when recovery points are taken, click Modify. The short-term recovery points are full backups. They are not incremental backups. When you are satisfied with the short-term goals, click Next.
  3. On the Review Disk Allocationpage, review and if necessary, modify the disk space for the VMs. The recommended disk allocations are based on the retention range that is specified in the Specify Short-Term Goals page, the type of workload, and the size of the protected data (identified in step 3).
    • Data size:Size of the data in the protection group.
    • Disk space:The recommended amount of disk space for the protection group. If you want to modify this setting, you should allocate total space that is slightly larger than the amount that you estimate each data source grows.
    • Colocate data:If you turn on colocation, multiple data sources in the protection can map to a single replica and recovery point volume. Colocation isn’t supported for all workloads.
    • Automatically grow:If you turn on this setting, if data in the protected group outgrows the initial allocation, System Center Data Protection Manager tries to increase the disk size by 25 percent.
    • Storage pool details:Shows the status of the storage pool, including total and remaining disk size.

When you are satisfied with the space allocation, click Next.

  1. On the Choose Replica Creation Methodpage, specify how you want to generate the initial copy, or replica, of the protected data on Azure Backup Server.

The default is Automatically over the network and Now. If you use the default, we recommend that you specify an off-peak time. Choose Later and specify a day and time.  For large amounts of data or less-than-optimal network conditions, consider replicating the data offline by using removable media. After you have made your choices, click Next.

  1. On the Consistency Check Optionspage, select how and when to automate the consistency checks. You can run consistency checks when replica data becomes inconsistent, or on a set schedule. If you don’t want to configure automatic consistency checks, you can run a manual check. In the protection area of the Azure Backup Server console, right-click the protection group and then select Perform Consistency Check. Click Next to move to the next page.
  2. On the Specify Online Protection Datapage, select one or more data sources that you want to protect. You can select the members individually, or click Select All to choose all members. After you choose the members, click Next.
  3. On the Specify Online Backup Schedulepage, specify the schedule to generate recovery points from the disk backup. After the recovery point is generated, it is transferred to the Recovery Services vault in Azure. When you are satisfied with the online backup schedule, click Next.
  4. On the Specify Online Retention Policypage, indicate how long you want to retain the backup data in Azure. After the policy is defined, click Next.
  5. On the Summarypage, review the details for your protection group members and settings, and then click Create Group.

Now you are ready to backup VMware VM using Backup Server v2.

Azure Backup Server v2

Azure Backup is used for backups and DR, and it works with managed disks as well as unmanaged disks. You can create a backup job with time-based backups, easy VM restoration, and backup retention policies.

Azure Backup for VMware

The following table is a summary of the solutions available for DR.

Scenario Automatic replication DR solution
Premium SSD disks

Managed disks

Local (locally redundant storage)

Cross region (read-access geo-redundant storage)

Azure Backup

Azure Backup Server

Unmanaged LRS and GRS Local (locally redundant storage)

Cross region (geo-redundant storage)

Azure Backup

Azure Backup Server

This article illustrates on how to use Azure Backup Server v2 to backup on-premises and Azure Workloads. Though Azure Backup Server shares much of the same functionality as DPM. Azure Backup Server does not back up to tape, nor does it integrate with System Center. Azure Backup Server is a dedicated role. Do not run any other application or role with the Azure Backup Server.

 

 

You can deploy Azure Backup Server from the Azure marketplace or on a On-premises server. The requirement to deploy Azure Backup server on a on-prem infrastructure is to have the below OS.

Operating System Platform SKU
Windows Server 2016 and latest SPs 64 bit Standard, Datacenter
Windows Server 2012/R2 and latest SPs 64 bit Standard, Datacenter,

Microsoft recommends you start with a gallery image of Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter or Windows Server 2016 Datacenter to create a Azure Backup Server. Here are the steps, you need to go through to deploy Azure Backup server.

Step1: Install Windows Virtual Machine from the Marketplace

  1. Sign in to the Azure portal at https://portal.azure.com.
  2. Choose Create a resource in the upper left-hand corner of the Azure portal.
  3. In the search box above the list of Azure Marketplace resources, search for and select Windows Server 2016 Datacenter, then choose Create.
  4. Provide a VM name, such as myVM, leave the disk type as SSD, then provide a username, such as azureuser. The password must be at least 12 characters long and meet the defined complexity requirements.
  5. Choose to Create newresource group, then provide a name, such as myResourceGroup. Choose your Location, then select OK.
  6. Select a size for the VM. You can filter by Compute typeor Disk type, for example. A suggested VM size is D2s_v3. Click Select after you have chosen a size.
  7. On the Settingspage, in Network > Network Security Group > Select public inbound ports, select HTTPand RDP (3389) from the drop-down. Leave the rest of the defaults and select OK.
  8. On the summary page, select Createto start the VM deployment.
  9. The VM is pinned to the Azure portal dashboard. Once the deployment has completed, the VM summary automatically opens.

Step2: Create Recovery Vault

  1. Sign in to your subscription in the Azure portal.
  2. In the left-hand menu, select All Services.
  3. In the All services dialog, type Recovery Services. As you begin typing, your input filters the list of resources. Once you see it, select Recovery Services vaults.
  4. On the Recovery Services vaultsmenu, select Add. The Recovery Services vaults menu opens. It prompts you to provide information for NameSubscriptionResource group, and Location.
  5. When you are ready to create the Recovery Services vault, click Create.

Step3: Select Appropriate Storage Type

  1. Select your vault to open the vault dashboard and the Settings menu. If the Settingsmenu doesn’t open, click All settings in the vault dashboard.
  2. On the Settingsmenu, click Backup Infrastructure > Backup Configuration to open the Backup Configuration On the Backup Configuration menu, choose the storage replication option for your vault.
  3. Select LRS or GRS type storage.

Step4: Download Backup Software

  1. Sign in to the Azure portal.
  2. click Browse.In the list of resources, type Recovery Services.
  3. As you begin typing, the list will filter based on your input. When you see Recovery Services vaults,
  4. From the list of Recovery Services vaults, select a vault.
  5. The Settingsblade opens up by default. If it is closed, click on Settings to open the settings blade.
  6. Click Backupto open the Getting Started wizard. In the Getting Started with backup blade that opens, Backup Goals will be auto-selected.
  7. In the Backup Goalblade, from the Where is your workload running menu, select On-premises.
  8. From the What do you want to backup?drop-down menu, select the workloads you want to protect using Azure Backup Server, and then click OK.
  9. In the Prepare infrastructureblade that opens, click the Download links for Install Azure Backup Server and Download vault credentials. You use the vault credentials during registration of Azure Backup Server to the recovery services vault. The links take you to the Download Center where the software package can be downloaded.
  10. Select all the files and click Next. Download all the files coming in from the Microsoft Azure Backup download page, and place all the files in the same folder.

Step5: Extract Software Package

After you’ve downloaded all the files, click MicrosoftAzureBackupInstaller.exe. This will start the Microsoft Azure Backup Setup Wizard to extract the setup files to a location specified by you. Continue through the wizard and click on the Extract button to begin the extraction process.

Step 6: Install Software Package

  1. Click Microsoft Azure Backupto launch the setup wizard.
  2. On the Welcome screen click the Next This takes you to the Prerequisite Checkssection. On this screen, click Check to determine if the hardware and software prerequisites for Azure Backup Server have been met. If all prerequisites are met successfully, you will see a message indicating that the machine meets the requirements. Click on the Next button.
  3. Microsoft Azure Backup Server requires SQL Server Standard. Further,the Azure Backup Server installation package comes bundled with the appropriate SQL Server binaries needed if you do not wish to use your own SQL. When starting with a new Azure Backup Server installation, you should pick the option Install new Instance of SQL Server with this Setupand click the Check and Install Once the prerequisites are successfully installed, click Next.
  4. Provide a location for the installation of Microsoft Azure Backup server files and click Next.
  5. Provide a strong password for restricted local user accounts and click Next.
  6. Select whether you want to use Microsoft Updateto check for updates and click Next.
  7. Review the Summary of Settingsand click Install.
  8. The installation happens in phases. In the first phase the Microsoft Azure Recovery Services Agent is installed on the server. The wizard also checks for Internet connectivity. If Internet connectivity is available you can proceed with installation, if not, you need to provide proxy details to connect to the Internet.
  9. Once registration of the Microsoft Azure Backup server successfully completes, the overall setup wizard proceeds to the installation and configuration of SQL Server and the Azure Backup Server components. Once the SQL Server component installation completes, the Azure Backup Server components are installed.
  10. When the installation step has completed, the product’s desktop icons will have been created as well. Just double-click the icon to launch the product.

Step7: Add a Data Disk to Azure Backup Server

  1. Log on to Azure Portal. In the menu on the left, click Virtual Machines.
  2. Select the virtual machine from the list.
  3. On the virtual machine page, click Disks.
  4. On the Diskspage, click + Add data disk.
  5. In the drop-down for the new disk, select Create disk.
  6. In the Create managed diskpage, type in a name for the disk and adjust the other settings as necessary. When you are done, click Create.
  7. In the Diskspage, click Save to save the new disk configuration for the VM.
  8. After Azure creates the disk and attaches it to the virtual machine, the new disk is listed in the virtual machine’s disk settings under Data disks.

Step8: Initialise the Disk of the Azure Backup Server

  1. Connect to the VM.
  2. Click the start menu inside the VM and type mscand hit Enter. Disk Management snap-in opens.
  3. Disk Management recognizes that you have a new, un-initialized disk and the Initialize Diskwindow pops up.
  4. Make sure the new disk is selected and click OKto initialize it.

Step9: Create a Storage Pool for Azure Backup Server

  1. Navigating to the Storage Pools page in Server Manager
  2. Launch Server Manager and navigate to the “File and Storage Services” page.
  3. Navigate to the Storage Pools page. Refresh the UI by clicking on the Refresh button.
  4. Logon as a user with admin privileges to your server, launch Server Manager, and then navigate to the “Storage Pools” page within the File and Storage Services Role.
  5. Right-click the “Available Disks” pool for the Storage Spaces subsystem and launch the New Storage Pool Wizard.
  6. Launch the New Storage Pool Wizard from the TASKS list.
  7. In the New Storage Pool Wizard, enter desired pool name and optional description. Make sure that you have selected the Primordial pool for the Storage Spaces subsystem.
  8. Select the number of disks needed for pool creation. If you want to designate a physical disk as a hot spare, then select the “Hot Spare” allocation type.
  9. Confirm the selected settings and initiate pool creation by selecting “Create” on the “Confirm selections” page.

Step10: Create a Virtual Disk

  1. Right-click the concrete pool that you just created (the pool where type value is Storage Pool), and then launch the New Virtual Disk Wizard.
  2. In the New Virtual Disk Wizard, make sure that you have selected the appropriate pool. Enter the desired virtual disk name and optional description.
  3. Select the desired storage layout and provisioning scheme as per your storage requirements.
  4. On the “Specify the size of the virtual disk” page, enter the desired size for the new virtual disk or pick the “Maximum size” option.
  • If you pick the “Maximum size” option, the system will try to create the largest size possible for the virtual disk.
  • If you select the check box for “Create the largest virtual disk possible, up to the specified size” while specifying the size then the system will try to create the largest size possible for the virtual disk up to the requested size.
  • It is also important to note that the value showing up as the storage pool free space (in our example 43.8GB) shows the actual free allocation the pool has overall. For cases with a fixed provisioning of a non-simple storage layout such as Mirror or Parity, when defining the size of the virtual disk, you have to take into account the overhead of storage needed to create the extra copies of the virtual disks extents for resiliency. As a basic example, with the 43.8GB free space in the pool, creating a 30GB mirrored virtual disk is not possible since it will take at least 60GB of free space in the pool to create a mirrored virtual disk to hold the two copies of the mirrored data.
  1. Confirm the settings and initiate virtual disk creation by selecting “Create” on the “Confirm selections” page.

Step11: Add Disk to Azure Backup Server

  1. Launch  Azure Backup Server and locate Disk Storage and Add – Select the disk, you want to add
  2. Once Added, this disk will be formatted with REFS file system and the storage will be available for Azure Backup Server.

Now you are ready to use Azure Backup Server. On my next blog, I will explain how to backup VMware VM using Azure Backup Server.

Deploy Work Folder in Azure Cloud

The concept of Work Folder is to store user’s data in a convenient location. User can access the work folder from BYOD and Corporate SOE from anywhere. The work folder facilitate flexible use of corporate information securely from supported devices. The work folder can be deployed on-premises and in Azure Cloud. In this article, I will demonstrate how to deploy Work Folder in Azure. Before that, let’s start with application of Work Folder.

Applications of Work Folder in Corporate Environment

  • Provide a single point of access to work files from a user’s work and personal devices
  • Access the work files online and offline. While accessing offline, the data can be synced back to the Sync Server when the device connected to internet or intranet again
  • Deploy with existing deployments of Folder Redirection, Offline Files, and home folders
  • Use Windows File Server, SMB Share and other CIFS share for example NetApp CIFS share
  • Use file classification and folder quotas, to manage user data
  • Apply security policy and encryption to encrypt Work Folders and use a lock screen password
  • Use Microsoft Failover Clustering with Work Folders to provide a high-availability solution

Enhanced Functionality:

  • Azure AD Application Proxy support
  • Faster change replication
  • Integrated with Windows Information Protection (WIP)
  • Microsoft Office integration

Supported Environment:

  • NetApp CIFS, Windows File Server or Windows SMB Storage as the UNC path of Sync Share
  • Windows Server 2012 R2 or Windows Server 2016 for hosting sync shares with user files
  • A public certificate or internal certificate domain joined computer
  • Windows Server 2012 R2 level AD DS Schema
  • Windows 10 version 1703,
  • Android 4.4 KitKat and later
  • iOS 10.2 and later

Internal DNS records (CNAME records)

  • workfolders.domain.com pointed to syncserver1.domain.com and sycserver2.domain.com
  • sts.domain.com point to ADFS Servers
  • enterpriseregistration.domain.com pointed to ADFS servers

Internal DNS records (Host A Record)

  • syncserver1.domain.com
  • syncserver2.domain.com

Publishing Work Folder for mobile workforce

  • Access from Internet or use Azure Credentials
  • Web Application Proxy
  • Active Directory Federation Services (AD FS) with public DNS record sts.domain.com and enterpriseregistration.domain.com
  • A public DNS record i.e. CNAME = workfolders.domain.com
  • A public certificate from a public CA i.e. CN= workfolders.domain.com SAN=syncserver1.domain.com, syncserver2work.domain.com. There must be private key associated with the certificate which means the certificate must in pfx format before importing into the sync servers.

Deploy Work Folder Server

  1. Log on to Azure Portal, Deploy a Windows Server 2016 from Azure Marketplace. Since we will be using this VM for Sync Share. I would recommend selecting an L series VM which storage optimised VM.
  2. Once the VM is provisioned, attached premium data disk for high I/O and low latency file store.
  3. Build a Windows Server 2016, Configure TCP/IP and Join the server to the domain
  4. Remote into the server using domain admins credential. Open the Add Roles and Features Wizard.
  5. On the Select installation type page, choose Role-based or feature-based deployment.
  6. On the Select destination server page, select the server on which you want to install Work Folders.
  7. On the Select server roles page, expand File and Storage Services, expand File and iSCSI Services, and then select Work Folders.
  8. When asked if you want to install IIS Hostable Web Core, click Ok to install the minimal version of Internet Information Services (IIS) required by Work Folders.
  9. Click Next until you have completed the wizard.
  10. Repeat the steps for all Work Folder Servers.

Install Certificate on the Work Folder Server

  1. On the Windows server 2016 where you want to install the SSL certificate, open the Console.
  2. In the Windows start menu, type mmc and open it.
  3. In the Console window, in the top menu, click File > Add/Remove Snap-in.
  4. In the Add or Remove Snap-ins window, in the Available snap-ins pane (left side), select Certificates and then click Add
  5. In the Certificate snap-in window, select Computer account and then click Next
  6. In the Select Computer window, select Local computer: (the computer this console is running on), and then click Finish
  7. In the Add or Remove Snap-ins window, click OK.
  8. In the Console window, in the Console Root pane (left side), expand Certificates (Local Computer), right-click on the Web Hosting folder, and then click All Tasks > Import.
  9. In the Certificate Import Wizard, on the Welcome to the Certificate Import Wizard page, click Next.
  10. On the File to Import page, browse to and select the file that you want import and then, click Next.
  11. Notes: In the File Explorer window, in the file type drop-down, make sure to select All Files (*.*). By default, it is set to search for 509 Certificate (*.cert;*.crt) file types only.
  12. On the Private key protection page, provide the password when you exported the certificate, check Mark the Private Key exportable for future use, and check import all extended properties.
  13. On the Certificate Store page, do the following and then click Next, Select Place all certificates in the following store and click Browse.
  14. In the Select Certificate Store window, select Web Hosting and click OK.
  15. On the Completing the Certificate Import Wizard page, verify that the settings are correct and then, click Finish.
  16. Repeat the steps for all Work Folder Servers.

Bind the Certificate:

  1. Log on to a jump box where IIS Management Console is installed, Open IIS Management Console, Connect to Work Folder Server. Select the Default Web Site for that server. The Default Web Site will appear disabled, but you can still edit the bindings for the site and select the certificate to bind it to that web site.
  2. Use the netsh command to bind the certificate to the Default Web Site https interface. The command is as follows:

netsh http add sslcert ipport=<IP address of Sync Share Server>:443 certhash=<Cert thumbprint> appid={CE66697B-3AA0-49D1-BDBD-A25C8359FD5D} certstorename=MY

Create Active Directory Security Group

  1. You need minimum two AD security groups for Work Folder. One for Work Folder Admin and another for Work Folder Sync Share. For this article, let’s assume we have a Sync Share. We will create two Security Groups named FS-HRShareUser-SG and FS-HRShareAdmin-SG
  2. Make sure these security group scope is Global not Universal. In the Members section, click Add. The Select Users, Contacts, Computers, Service Accounts or Groups dialog box appears.

Create a Sync Share

  1. In Server Manager, click File and Storage Services, and then click Work Folders.
  2. A list of any existing sync shares is visible at the top of the details pane. To create a new sync share, from the Tasks menu choose New Sync Share…. The New Sync Share Wizard appears.
  3. On the Select the server and path page, specify where to store the sync share. If you already have a file share created for this user data, you can choose that share. Alternatively you can create a new folder.
  4. On the Specify the structure for user folders page, choose a naming convention for user folders within the sync share. Select either User alias or User alias@domain
  5. On the Enter the sync share name page, specify a name and a description for the sync share. This is not advertised on the network but is visible in Server Manager
  6. On the Grant sync access to groups page, specify the group that you created that lists the users allowed to use this sync share.
  7. On the Specify device policies page, specify whether to request any security restrictions on client PCs and devices. Select either Automatically lock screen, and require a password or Encrypt Work Folders based on your requirements.
  8. Review your selections and complete the wizard to create the sync share.

Setup a Tech Support Email Address

  1. In Server Manager, click File and Storage Services, and then click Servers.
  2. Right-click the sync server, and then click Work Folders Settings. The Work Folders Settings window appears.
  3. In the navigation pane, click Support Email and then type the email address or addresses that users should use when emailing for help with Work Folders. Click Ok when you’re

Publish Work Folder using ADFS Server

You can set up and configure the relying party trust for Work Folders, even though Work Folders hasn’t been set up yet. The relying party trust must be set up to enable Work Folders to use AD FS. Because you’re in the process of setting up AD FS, now is a good time to do this step.

To set up the relying party trust:

  1. Log on to ADFS Server. Open Server Manager, on the Tools menu, select AD FS Management.
  2. In the right-hand pane, under Actions, click Add Relying Party Trust.
  3. On the Welcome page, select Claims aware and click Start.
  4. On the Select Data Source page, select Enter data about the relying party manually, and then click Next.
  5. In the Display name field, enter WorkFolders, and then click Next.
  6. On the Configure Certificate page, click Next..
  7. On the Configure URL page, click Next.
  8. On the Configure Identifiers page, add the following identifier: https://workfolders.domain.com/V1. This identifier is a hard-coded value used by Work Folders, and is sent by the Work Folders service when it is communicating with AD FS. Click Next.
  9. On the Choose Access Control Policy page, select Permit Everyone, and then click Next.
  10. On the Ready to Add Trust page, click Next.
  11. After the configuration is finished, the last page of the wizard indicates that the configuration was successful. Select the checkbox for editing the claims rules, and click Close.
  12. In the AD FS snap-in, select the WorkFolders relying party trust and click Edit Claim Issuance Policy under Actions.
  13. The Edit Claim Issuance Policy for WorkFolders window opens. Click Add rule.
  14. In the Claim rule template drop-down list, select Send LDAP Attributes as Claims, and click Next.
  15. On the Configure Claim Rule page, in the Claim rule name field, enter WorkFolders.
  16. In the Attribute store drop-down list, select Active Directory.
  17. In the mapping table, enter these values:
    • User-Principal-Name: UPN
    • Display Name: Name
    • Surname: Surname
    • Given-Name: Given Name
  18. Click Finish. You’ll see the WorkFolders rule listed on the Issuance Transform Rules tab and click OK.
  19. In the AD FS snap-in, select the WorkFolders relying party trust, On the properties, choose the Encryption tab, Remove the certificate encryption
  20. Choose the Signature tab and make sure the Work Folder Certificate was imported
  21. Click Apply, Click Ok.

Set relying part trust options

These commands set options that are needed for Work Folders to communicate successfully with AD FS, and can’t be set through the UI. These options are:

  • Enable the use of JSON web tokens (JWTs)
  • Disable encrypted claims
  • Enable auto-update
  • Set the issuing of Oauth refresh tokens to All Devices.
  • Grant clients access to the relying party trust

Set-ADFSRelyingPartyTrust -TargetIdentifier “https://workfolders.domain.com/V1&#8221; -EnableJWT $true

Set-ADFSRelyingPartyTrust -TargetIdentifier “https://workfolders.domain.com/V1&#8221; -Encryptclaims $false

Set-ADFSRelyingPartyTrust -TargetIdentifier “https://workfolders.domain.com/V1&#8221; -AutoupdateEnabled $true

Set-ADFSRelyingPartyTrust -TargetIdentifier “https://workfolders.domain.com/V1&#8221; -IssueOAuthRefreshTokensTo AllDevices

Grant-AdfsApplicationPermission -ServerRoleIdentifier “https://workfolders.domain.com/V1&#8221; –AllowAllRegisteredClients

Enable Workplace Join

To enable device registration for Workplace Join, you must run the following Windows PowerShell commands, which will configure device registration and set the global authentication policy:

Initialize-ADDeviceRegistration -ServiceAccountName domain\svc-adfsservices$

Set-ADFSGlobalAuthenticationPolicy -DeviceAuthenticationEnabled $true

Set up AD FS authentication

To configure Work Folders to use AD FS for authentication, follow these steps:

  1. Log on to Sync Share Server. Open Server Manager.
  2. Click Servers, and then select your Work Folders server in the list.
  3. Right-click the server name, and click Work Folders Settings.
  4. In the Work Folder Settings window, select Active Directory Federation Services, and type in the ADFS URL. Click Apply. In the test example, the URL is https://sts.domain.com.

Publish the Work Folders web application

The next step is to publish a web application that will make Work Folders available to clients. To publish the Work Folders web application, follow these steps:

  1. Import Work Folder Certificate into WAP Servers
  2. Open Server Manager, and on the Tools menu, click Remote Access Management to open the Remote Access Management Console.
  3. Under Configuration, click Web Application Proxy.
  4. Under Tasks, click Publish. The Publish New Application Wizard opens.
  5. On the Welcome page, click Next.
  6. On the Preauthentication page, select Active Directory Federation Services (AD FS), and click Next.
  7. On the Support Clients page, select OAuth2, and click Next.
  8. On the Relying Party page, select Work Folders, and then click Next. This list is published to the Web Application Proxy from AD FS.
  9. On the Publishing Settings page, enter the following and then click Next, use these values:
  1. The confirmation page shows the Windows PowerShell command that will execute to publish the application. Click Publish.
  2. On the Results page, you should see the application was published successfully.

Configure Work Folders on the client

To configure Work Folders on the non-domain join client machine, follow these steps:

  1. On the client machine, open Control Panel and click Work Folders.
  1. Click Set up Work Folders.
  1. On the Enter your work email address page, enter either the user’s email address (for example, user@domain.com) or the Work Folders URL (in the test example, https://workfolders.domain.com), and then click Next.
  2. If the user is connected to the corporate network, the authentication is performed by Windows Integrated Authentication. If the user is not connected to the corporate network, the authentication is performed by ADFS (OAuth) and the user will be prompted for credentials. Enter your credentials and click OK.
  3. After you have authenticated, Click Next.
  4. The Security Policies page lists the security policies that you set up for Work Folders. Click Next.
  5. A message is displayed stating that Work Folders has started syncing with your PC. Click Close.
  6. The Manage Work Folders page shows the amount of space available on the server, sync status, and so on. If necessary, you can re-enter your credentials here. Close the window.
  7. Your Work Folders folder opens automatically. You can add content to this folder to sync between your devices.

To configure Work Folders on the domain joined client machine, follow these steps:

  1. Configure using GPO, use Go to User Configuration > Administrative Templates > Windows Components > Work Folders > Specify Work Folders settings.
  2. Specify Work Folder URL as workfolders.domain.com
  3. Apply the GPO to selected OU.

Relevant Article:

Work Folder FAQ

NetApp CIFS shares not mounting to Windows Server 2012

 

ADFS 4.0 Step by Step Guide: Federating with Splunk Cloud

To integrate On-Premises SSO with Splunk Cloud, you need the following items:

  • An administrative account in your ADFS
  • An administrative account in your Windows Active Directory
  • An administrative account for your Splunk Cloud instance or tenant.

Step1: Create Security Groups

  1. Sign into Domain Controller
  2. Open Active Directory Users and Computers
  3. Create two security groups named, SG-SplunkAdmin and SG-SplunkUsers

Step2: Download IdP (ADFS 2016) Metadata

  1. Log into the ADFS 2016 server or an admin PC.
  2. Open a browser and type metadata URL https://ADFSServer1.domain.com/federationmetadata/2007-06/federationmetadata.xml
  3. Download and save the metadata as IdP metadata.

Step3: Download Splunk Metadata

  1. Login to Splunk Cloud instance using administrator credentials.
  2. Download metadata from your instance of Splunk Cloud or This can be obtained by, once logged into a session as an admin role user, entering the URL https://yourinstance.splunkcloud.com/saml/spmetadata into your browser’s URL field.
  3. Download and save the metadata as SP metadata

Step4: Extract Splunk certificate from metadata

  1. Open Splunk metadata XML file in a notepad, Search “X509Certificate” in the metadata. Copy the everything starting from XML tags from ‘<ds:X509Certificate>‘ to ‘</ds:X509Certificate>‘.
  2. Open a new notepad and paste the content into the notepad. Place a row above the certificate with the text —–BEGIN CERTIFICATE—– and a row below the certificate with the text —–END CERTIFICATE—–
  3. Save the notepad as a .cer
  4. The file will look like this one but with more hexadecimal character

—–BEGIN CERTIFICATE—–

MIIEsjCCA5qgAwIBAgIQFofWiG3iMAaFIz2/Eb9llzANBgkqhkiG9w0BAQsFADCB

sjFuz4DliAc2UXu6Ya9tjSNbNKOVvKIxf/L157fo78S1JzLp955pxyvovrsMqufq

YBLqJop4

—–END CERTIFICATE—–

Step5: Create a Relying Party Trust

  1. Log into the ADFS 2016 server and open the management console.
  2. Right-click Service>Relying Party Trusts>Select Add Relying Party Trust from the top right corner of the window.
  3. Click Claims aware>Click Start
  4. Click Import Data about the relying party
  5. Browse the location where you saved Splunk metadata, select metadata, and Click Next
  6. Type the Display Name as SplunkRP, Click Next
  7. Ensure I do not want to configure multi-factor authentication […] is chosen, and click Next
  8. Permit all users to access this relying party.
  9. Click Next and clear the Open the Claims when this finishes check box.
  10. Close this page. The new relying party trust appears in the window.
  11. Right-click on the relying party trust and select Properties.
  12. On the properties, choose the Encryption tab, Remove the certificate encryption
  13. Choose the Signature tab and make sure the Splunk Certificate was imported
  14. Select to the Advanced tab and set the Secure hash algorithm to SHA-1.
  15. Click into the Identifiers tab. The default Relying party identifier for Splunk came in from the metadata file as ‘splunkEntityId’. Remove Default one. Add new entity ID splunk-yourinstance
  16. Under the Endpoints tab, make sure the Consumer Endpoints is https://yourinstance.splunkcloud.com/saml/acs  with a Post binding and index 0
  17. Under the Endpoints tab, make sure the make sure the Logout Endpoints is https://yourinstance.splunkcloud.com/saml/logout with a Post binding
  18. Click Apply, Click Ok.

Step6: Add Claim Rule for the Relying Party

  1. Log into the ADFS server and open the management console.
  2. Right-click on the Splunk relying party trust and select Edit Claim Rules.
  3. Click the Issuance Transform Rules tab.
  4. Click Add Rules. Add a Rule Type the Name as Rule1
  5. Ensure Send LDAP Attributes as Claims is selected, and click Next
  6. Select the below details

Claim Rule Name =  Rule1

Attribute Store = Active Directory

LDAP Attribute Outgoing Claim Type
Display-Name realName

 

Token-Groups – Unqualified Names Role
E-Mail-Addresses mail
  1. Click Finish. Click Apply
  2. Click Add Rules. Add a Rule Type the Name as  Rule2
  3. Ensure Transform an Incoming Claim is selected, and click Next
  4. Select the below details
Claim Rule Name Rule2

 

Incoming claim type UPN

 

Incoming NameID format Unspecified
Outgoing Claim Type Name ID
Outgoing name ID format Transient Identifier
  1. Click Finish. Click Apply

Step7: Import Splunk Certificate into ADFS Server

  1. Sign into ADFS Server, Open Command Prompt as an Administrator, type MMC.exe
  2. Click File, Click Add/Remove Snap-in
  3. Click Certificates, Click Computer Account
  4. Right Click on Trusted People>All Tasks>Import Certificate
  5. Browse the location of certificate and import
  6. Close MMC.
  7. Repeat these steps in all ADFS Servers in your farm.

Step8: Setup SigningCertificateRevocationCheck to None

Sign into primary ADFS, open PowerShell as an administrator, type the following and hit enter.

Set-ADFSRelyingPartyTrust -TargetName “SplunkRP” -SigningCertificateRevocationCheck None

Step9: Configure SplunkCloud in your instance

  1. On the Splunk instance as an Admin user, choose Settings->Access Controls->Authentication Method.  Choose SAML then click on the Configure Splunk to use SAML’ button.
    within the SAML Groups setup page in Splunk, click on the SAML Configuration button in the upper right corner.
  2. The SAML Configuration popup window will appear. Click on Select File to import the XML Metadata file (or copy and paste the contents into the Metadata Contents textbox) and click Apply.
  3. The following fields should be automatically populated by the metadata:
    Single Sign On (SSO) URL
    Single Log Out (SLO) URL
    idP’s Certificate file
    Sign AuthnRequest (checked)
    Sign SAML response (checked)
    Enter in the Entity ID as splunk-yourinstance as was used in ADFS RP Identifier property of the ADFS configuration.
  4. Scroll down to the ‘Advanced Settings‘ section.
    Enter in the Fully Qualified Domain Name (FQDN) of the Splunk Cloud instance – ‘https://yourinstance.splunkcloud.com
    Enter a ‘0‘ (zero) for the Redirect port – load balancer’s port.
    Set the Attribute Alias Role to ‘http://schemas.microsoft.com/ws/2008/06/identity/claims/role’
    It may also be necessary to set an Attribute Alias for ‘Real Name’ and ‘Mail’ – but not all implementations require these settings. Click Save to Save the configuration:
  5. The next step is set up the SAML groups. Within the Splunk ‘Settings->Access Controls->Authentication Method->SAML Settings‘ page, click the green “New Group” button
  6. Enter a group name that associates with ADFS Active Directory passed group names, some examples follow
Group Name (Type this name on New Group Properties ) Splunk Role (Select from Available Roles) Active Directory Security Group
SG-SplunkAdmin Admin SG-SplunkAdmin
SG-SplunkUsers User SG-SplunkUsers
  1. Click Save.

Step10: Testing SSO

  1. To test SSO, visit  https://yourinstance.splunkcloud.com/en-US/account/login?loginType=splunk  You will be redirected to ADFS STS Signing Page. Enter your on-premises email address and password as the credential.  You should be redirected back to Splunk Cloud.
  2. Also test logging out of Splunk, you should be re-directed to the Splunk SAML logout page.